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Duration

One year full-time, two years part-time

Application Deadline

01 June 2021

Location

St George's, University of London and Kings College London

Start dates

September 2021

This course follows a curriculum designed by Health Education England and is suitable for healthcare professionals and other students with an interest in genomic medicine. As the programme is jointly taught by St George’s and King’s, students will benefit from the breadth of expertise provided by both institutions.

You will learn how recent technological advances have transformed how genomic data is generated, analysed and presented, and its relevance to a range of clinical scenarios, as well as how to handle such big data.

Development of knowledge and skills in these areas will enable healthcare professionals to deliver services aligned with the values of the NHS constitution. Life science graduates may use this as a stepping stone to a range of careers including in the NHS, the pharmaceutical industry, and bioinformatics, or as preparation for a PhD. This is a flexible programme and is structured to provide options for PgCert and PgDip awards as well as the MSc or, if you prefer, modular study towards your Continuous Personal and Professional Development (CPPD). 

For more information about the course, watch the Genomic Medicine Course Talk 2020.

Read more information about our courses and university services terms and conditions.

Covid-19 updates

We won’t be making any significant changes to the content of our programmes, but there will be some changes to the way they are delivered. Please see the Covid-19 updates tab for further details of how this may affect this course.

Highlights

  • This qualification is awarded by St George’s and taught in partnership with King’s College London. Both institutions are NHS preferred providers.
  • Taught jointly by St George’s and King’s, institutions with world-class research, clinical and teaching expertise across the full spectrum of genomic medicine.

  • Integrated within the South London Genomic Medicine Centre.

  • Both campuses co-located with leading teaching hospitals.

  • Institutional expertise in multi-professional education.

  • St George’s scored 92% overall student satisfaction in Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey 2014.

  • Both institutions ranked among the top 200 universities in the world according to the recent Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

  • Specialist optional taught modules in Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics,  Advanced Bioinformatics and Counselling Skills reflectively institutional expertise.

The past 20 years has seen an explosion in our ability to explore the human genome due to technological advances; of all the life sciences, genomics is the field which has seen the most changes.

The very fact that we now speak of genomics rather than genetics reflects an element of this change; no longer is the focus of research and clinical work solely on the unit of the gene (a mere 2% of the genome) but instead we look across all elements, coding and not coding. We seek to understand the transcriptome, the set of RNA molecules encoded by the genome that varies depending on cell type and also changes over time, and the role that variation here plays in disease. The epigenome provides a further layer of complexity leading to differences even between monozygotic twins who have identical genomes. 

The world of bioinformatics means that we now have the tools to analyse 'omic variation, to handle this big data and make sense of it. The implications of these advances in the world of genomics means that all of healthcare is now impacted in some way. 

Our understanding of tumour genomics affects cancer treatment. Our ability to interrogate both human and microbial genomes allows us to assess host-pathogen interactions or to trace patterns of infection in pandemics. Clinicians need to be able to consider the ethical implications of available personal genomic data. Pharmacologists can look to develop medication which is personalised to an individual’s genetic make-up. These are just a few examples of how genomics impacts across all the specialities of healthcare and in research in these areas as well. This is, quite simply, a most exciting time for genomics and everyone involved in the field.

Kate Everett

Kate Everett

Course Director

I am a passionate educator and researcher in the field of human disease genetics.

View profile

Fees and funding

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Funding your study

If you work for the NHS then you are eligible for funding from Health Education England for up to four taught modules. Apply to us indicating that you require HEE funding are we will forward your information to HEE for consideration. HEE funding is limited so please apply as soon as possible. Visit Genomics England Education for more information.

We have a range of funding opportunities available for students. You may be eligible for the following.

Tuition fees

2021 UK/EU Entry
  • Full-time MSc: £13,750

  • Part-time MSc: £7,250 per annum

  • Part-time Postgraduate Diploma: £5,000 per annum

  • Part-time Postgraduate Certificate: £2,600 per annum

  • Genomic Medicine Module: £1,350

2020 Non-EU (international)
  • Full-time MSc: £22,000

  • Part-time MSc: £11,500 per annum

  • Part-time Postgraduate Diploma: £9,000 per annum

  • Part-time Postgraduate Certificate: £4,550 per annum

  • Genomic Medicine Module: £2,250

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

Additional costs

The following table gives you an indication of additional costs associated with your course.  These costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Item 

Description

Technology requirements

Find out more about technology requirements associated with online learning.

Find out more 

Learn more about what it’s like to study at St George’s, University of London.  

Sign up for our free intro email series.

To be considered for this course, you will need to:

  • meet the entry criteria

  • write a personal statement

  • provide two suitable references.

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Undergraduate degree or equivalent

You should have or be expected to achieve, a minimum of a second class degree (2:2) in a relevant bioscience degree with sufficient genetics content. For healthcare graduates, a pass is required. All degrees must be awarded before 1st August on the year of entry.

We may invite you to interview if are unable to make a decision directly from your application.

Alternative professional qualifications, or previous related experience, may be considered and we encourage you to apply.

International qualifications

We accept equivalent qualifications gained in other countries and use to UKNARIC to assess. Please see our International Student Support pages for more information. If you have any questions, you can contact us at study@sgul.ac.uk

English language

For details on English Language requirements, please see here. This is a Group 1 course.

Personal statement and references

You will be asked to outline your reasons for applying for the course in a brief personal statement on the application form. You will also need to provide two satisfactory references. See the ‘Apply’ tab for more information.

Within this programme there are several academic awards you can study towards. You can choose to study either single modules, a PgCert, a PgDip or a full MSc. If you work in the NHS our modules are available with or without assessment, fully funded by Health Education England as part of your ‘workforce development’ (subject to available commissions). Each taught module is worth 15 credits.

Award structure

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MSc (180 credits, 8–10 modules plus research project)

  • Fundamentals of Human Genetics and Genomics

  • Omics Techniques and Technologies; Their Application to Genomic Medicine

  • Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis

  • Research Project (60 credit or 30 credit)

Plus at least three from:

  • Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening and Treatment

  • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Healthcare

  • Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Disease

  • Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease

Plus between one and four from:

  • Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics

  • Introduction to Counselling Skills in Genomics

  • Ethical, legal and social issues in applied genomics

  • Advanced Bioinformatics

PgDip (120 credit, 8 modules)

There are two routes available for this award to suit your career goals and interests.

Option 1

Five core modules:

  • Fundamentals of Human Genetics and Genomics

  • Omics Techniques and Technologies; Their Application to Genomic Medicine

  • Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis

  • Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening and Treatment

  • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Healthcare.

Plus three from:

  • Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Disease

  • Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease

  • Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues in Applied Genomics

  • Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics

  • An introduction to counselling skills in genomics.
Option 2
  • Fundamentals of Human Genetics and Genomics

  • Omics Techniques and Technologies; Their Application to Genomic Medicine

  • Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis

  • Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Disease

  • Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease

  • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Healthcare OR Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Cancer Diagnosis, Screening and Treatment

  • Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues in Applied Genomics OR Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics

  • Any other module (including those optional ones listed above).

PgCert (60 credits, four modules)

PgCert Genomic Medicine (Standard)

The majority of PgCert will elect to follow this pathway as it includes the core elements of the programme.

  • Fundamentals of human genetics and genomics
  • Omics techniques and technologies; their application to genomic medicine
  • Bioinformatics Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis
  • Genomics of common and rare inherited disease OR Application of genomics to infectious disease OR Cardiovascular genetics and genomics
PgCert Genomic Medicine (Medical)

Some students who already have significant knowledge of genomics can elect not to do the Fundamentals of Human Genetics and Genomics module and instead complete the following combination of modules.

  • Omics Techniques and Technologies
  • PLUS 1 from:
    • Bioinformatics
    • Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Healthcare
    • Molecular Pathology of Cancer
  • PLUS 2 from:
    • Genomics of Common and Rare Disease
    • Application of Genomics to Infectious Disease
    • Cardiovascular genetics and genomics
PgCert Genomic Medicine (Bioinformatics)

Some students who already have a significant knowledge of genomics and technologies and have a particular interest in data handling, may consider this pathway.

    • Bioinformatics
    • Advanced Bioinformatics
    • PLUS 2 from:
      • Genomics of Common and Rare Disease
      • Application of Genomics to Infectious Disease
      • Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics
PgCert Genomic Healthcare - new

This course has been designed based on feedback from our clinical students, including nurses, as to those modules which are most helpful to their daily work.  Students on this course will do the following modules:

  • Fundamentals of Human Genetics and Genomics
  • Genomics of common and rare disease
  • An introduction to counselling skills in genomics
  • Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues in Applied Genomics

Module descriptions

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Core modules

Fundamentals of Human Genetics and Genomics (15 credits)

This module provides an introduction to the key areas of genomics, human genetics and genetic variation, including an understanding of disease genetics and how genomic medicine can illuminate disease mechanisms and biology. 

Delivered at St George's.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Teaching dates: 9 - 15 September 2020

Omics Techniques and Their Application to Genomic Medicine (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 15 - 21 October 2020

This module covers the range of multi-omics technologies, their interpretation, and application in key areas of healthcare such as cancer, rare inherited diseases, and infectious diseases, as well as research.

Delivered at King’s College London.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Bioinformatics, Interpretation, Statistics and Data Quality Assurance (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 18 - 24 November 2020

This module provides the knowledge and understanding required to critically interpret existing genomic research and develop the skills to formulate research questions. It also provides the skills to collect, analyse and interpret NHS data using a basic range of statistical and bioinformatics techniques.

Delivered at King’s College London.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Please note this module is now closed for applications.

Core elective modules

Genomics of Common and Rare Inherited Diseases (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 30 September - 6 October 2020

This module provides an introduction to the clinical presentation and manifestations of rare inherited and common diseases, and considers the patient and family perspective with respect to the role and impact of genomics. It reviews traditional and current strategies and techniques used to identify genes responsible for both common multifactorial and rare inherited diseases.

Delivered at St George’s.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 7 - 11 December 2020

This module shows how genomics can be used to provide more accurate diagnosis, predict which drugs are likely to be more effective, and monitor treatment and control of infectious disease in both individuals and populations.

Delivered at St George’s.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Healthcare (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 20 - 26 January 2021

This module provides a comprehensive overview of the analytical strategies and techniques used in pharmacogenomics and explores some of the challenges and limitations in this field. It also provides an overview of the different types of genomic biomarkers currently in use or emerging.

Delivered at King’s College London.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Application in Diagnosis, Screening, and Treatment (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 24 February - 2 March 2021

This module provides detailed knowledge and understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development, including how interrogation of a person’s own genome and the genome of tumour cells can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Delivered at King’s College London.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Optional modules

 

An Introduction to Counselling Skills in Genomics (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 25 - 31 March 2021

The aim of this module is to equip students with the knowledge, communication and counselling skills, and appropriate attitudes and behaviours towards the diagnosis and management of patients whose care will be influenced by genomic investigations.

Delivered at St George’s.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Advanced Bioinformatics (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 11 - 17 March 2021

This module builds upon and extends the module Bioinformatics, Interpretation and Data Quality Assurance in Genome Analysis and further explores state of the art bioinformatics pipelines for genetic data in a clinical context, suitable for studying genetic variants underlying Mendelian diseases, cancer genetics, and RNA expression data using Galaxy. It introduces you to basic bioinformatic data skills using the command line, R/RStudio and Bioconductor. You will learn about the landscape of tools for read mapping and variant calling and how they are suitable for different types of genetic data and analysis. Lectures will be combined with computer practicals where you can practice designing your own bioinformatics pipelines in the Galaxy environment and work with real RNA expression and cancer genomics datasets. The course will also provide a primer for working with large genetic datasets using command line tools, simple scripting and R/RStudio and Bioconductor.

To study this module you will need to have completed the Bioinformatics, Interpretation, Statistics and Data Quality Assurance core module.

Delivered at King’s College London.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Cardiovascular Genetics and Genomics (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 4 - 9 February 2021

This module will introduce you to the role of genomics in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, in terms of both common and rare disease, and will discuss the impact that our growing knowledge of the genomic aetiology of these conditions is having on management.

Delivered at St George’s.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Applied Genomics (15 credits)

Teaching dates: 17- 22 February 2021

This module aims to provide a framework for the ethical understanding of medical genomics. Students will be provided with a platform of ethical understanding from which to consider issues of human confidentiality, autonomy, disclosure, informed consent and natural justice.

Delivered at St George’s.

Download the module guide (PDF).

Teaching will be delivered at both St George’s and King’s College London and will include a variety of methods including lectures, seminars, workshops and online formats. 

Progress throughout the course will be assessed through a variety of methods, including single best answer questions, short answer questions, essays and oral presentations.

Unlike traditional degree programmes in which you expect to attend teaching sessions every day of the week for the duration of each semester, teaching occurs in blocks of five consecutive working days for each module (see module dates).  You are expected to attend all teaching sessions on these days and should expect the timetable to run from 9am to 5pm each day. Modules are either taught at St George’s or at King’s College depending on whether it is a St George’s or King’s led module. Teaching will combine a mixture of lectures, to provide key theory and concepts, and interactive tutorials and workshops, allowing you to apply your new knowledge and skills. 

Three Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) have been designed to support student learning outside of this face-to-face teaching time. One of these, The Genomics Era, is expected pre-course learning and usually runs in July to August.  Students will need to use their time between these blocks of teaching to embed their knowledge through recommended reading and to prepare their assignments. As this is a modular programme, there is no final exam; instead each module has two assessments which must be passed for academic credit (15 credits per taught module). 

This course is designed for students who wish to acquire training in genomic technologies and their interpretation within a medical context.

An MSc in Genomic Medicine will provide career opportunities for a range of professions, from laboratory-based researchers to diagnostic and healthcare professionals. Our graduates have gone on to work in clinical diagnostics, clinical trials, scientist training programme, bioinformatics, laboratory research assistant, and have continued on to study postgraduate medicine and PhDs.

How to apply

Before beginning your application please check the entry criteria of the course you wish to study to ensure you meet the required standards.

If you work for the NHS and wish to be considered for HEE funding, please make this clear on your application.

Applications must be submitted through our online application system, which you can access below. 

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Access our online application system

  1. Select the application link for your chosen course and mode of study:

  2. You will be asked to create an account. 

  3. Once you have created your account, you will be able to complete an application form and upload any relevant documents. You can save a partly completed form and return to it later. Please make sure you complete all sections. Please make sure that the information you provide is accurate, including the options you select in menus.

  4. Add pgadmissions@sgul.ac.uk to your address book to ensure you do not miss any important emails from us.

  5. When you have checked that your application is complete and accurate, click ‘submit’.

You can track your application through your online account.

Applying for a module

If you are applying to study a module please note the following.

  • Applications should be submitted at least two months before the start date of the module at the latest. We cannot guarantee your application will be considered if you apply later than this. All students must attend an induction and enrolment day at St George’s University.  These are held in September and in January so candidates for individual modules should be aware that they need to apply in sufficient time before the module teaching dates to allow for their application to be processed and attendance at induction to be therefore be possible.

  • Applicants should complete the basic information on the application form.

Please enter the following information in the ‘personal statement’ section of your application form:

  • full title and start date of your desired module

  • if you would like to take the assessment or not.

  • Whether you are applying for HEE funding

We only require one reference, which can either be professional or academic. The application form will ask for two references: please enter the details of your one referee in both sections. If your application is successful you will be required to complete an online enrolment module and provide valid ID (such as a valid passport or driving licence) to enable you to join the programme. Full information will be provided if you are made an offer.

Guidance for completing your references

When completing your application, you will be asked to provide contact details of two referees. Please ensure these details are accurate. As soon as you have submitted your application, your referees will be contacted by the university asking them to upload a reference to your online application.

One must be a recent academic reference. The other should be either a second academic reference or a professional/employer reference. They should cover your suitability for the course and your academic ability.

Your referees should know you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. We do not accept references from family, friends, partners, ex-partners or yourself.

We will send reminder emails to your referees but it is your responsibility to ensure that contact details are correct and referees are available to submit a reference. References should be uploaded within two weeks of making your application.

We have been working hard to find ways to teach our courses without disruption, while keeping our staff and students safe and making sure we follow government guidance on Covid-19. We won’t be making any significant changes to the content of our programmes, but there will be some changes to the way they are delivered. Please see below for further details of how this may affect this course.

If government advice changes, we may need to update our plans. If we do so, we will update this information, and will keep current students and offer holders informed by email.

We will also continue to update our frequently asked questions page for applicants and offer holders as more information becomes available.

Course content

We are not intending to make any significant changes to the content of the Genomic Medicine programme.

The programme is modular, and its learning outcomes are prescribed by Health Education England (HEE). These will not change due to Covid-19. However, the Application of Genomics in Infectious Disease module will be updated to include material relevant to the pandemic.

We were not able to deliver the Introduction to Counselling Skills module in 2019/20 due to the Covid-19 outbreak. However, we are committed to delivering this module in 2020/21, as it is essential for some students to be able to complete their study. Even if it has to be delivered online, this will happen. 

(We are not offering the Teaching, Learning and Assessment in Science and Healthcare module in 2020/21, but this is not because of Covid-19. We had already planned not to provide it for a year to allow for it to be redesigned. It has not been advertised for this year of entry.)

MSc students complete a project which can be either 30-credit or 60-credit.  Typically, about two-thirds of the 60-credit projects are laboratory-based (‘wet’). PLEASE NOTE: it may not be possible to do a ‘wet’ project, depending on the situation with the pandemic in 2021. Instead, all students may need to complete a ‘dry’ project.

 

Module/component

Academic year to which the change will apply

Description of change

Teaching, Learning and Assessment in Science and Healthcare

2020/21

Not being provided to allow time for redesign (unrelated to Covid-19)

60-credit projects

2020/21

All projects may need to be ‘dry’, i.e. non-laboratory-based

Supporting vulnerable students

Students considered to be most at risk from Covid-19 should work at home wherever possible in line with government advice. Students who are going on placement will be required to complete an individual risk assessment and others may choose to do so. In addition, students from vulnerable groups, including care leavers, students estranged from their families and students with disabilities, are prioritised for help from the University’s Hardship Funds and for accommodation in Horton Halls. Priority for loans of laptops from the University will be given to those eligible to receive a hardship grant; those registered as disabled, care leavers or with caring responsibilities; and international students who may have difficulty sourcing an appropriate device on arrival in the UK.

We recognise the impact that the current circumstances may have on mental health and have expanded our counselling provision, offering remote appointments to any student. In addition, every student will be allocated a personal tutor to offer individual pastoral and academic support from the start of their studies. (Further information about health and wellbeing advice during Covid-19 is available here.)

Priority consideration has been given to support for students with disabilities when accessing teaching and learning online, through the provision of automatic live captioning and British Sign Language within our primary technologies of Panopto, MS Teams and Big Blue Button. These can benefit a range of students, especially those who are deaf or hard of hearing, as well as students with an Autistic Spectrum Condition (ASC), memory processing issues, and for whom English is an additional language.

Human-level captioning is also available where a need has been established through the Disability Advisory team. Human-level captioning requests are processed by the Learning Technology Services (LTS) section and can be requested by email to lts@sgul.ac.uk.  

How the course will be delivered

The existing learning outcomes for our modules and courses will remain in place. From September to December 2020 all students will primarily access their learning, including learning materials, via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Canvas. Hands-on practical teaching and learning activities will be delivered on campus with appropriate social distancing and personal protective equipment (PPE) measures put in place, and with controls on the number of people in each location.

The online components of the course will be designed to balance interactive real-time sessions with lecturers and other students, with self-paced independent study. Students will have clear learning pathways through the activities they are expected to engage with, and there will be opportunities to check learning and progress.

Personal tutor support and all other student support, such as the Academic Success Centre, will also be online for this period, using a range of methods for staying in touch, such as telephone, email and the University’s web conferencing systems BigBlueButton and MSTeams.  

Pending Health Education England (HEE) approval, placements are currently expected to resume from September 2020 with minimum changes to planned delivery or timings. All students on placement will be expected to undertake a risk assessment and adhere to local Trust working patterns and guidance.   

To get the most from online study, hardware requirements have been established and communicated to all existing students and offer holders. Students will need their own personal computer or laptop and an internet connection in their place of accommodation. This needs to be in place at the start of the course. Once enrolled, students will have the ability to use Office 365 as part of our institutional licence, and access software required for their modules/courses via AppsAnywhere. In addition, we offer Office for Mac via Ofice365, but only the following applications are available for Mac: Teams, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, OneNote. Web-based Office applications are available on Mac. Full details are available here. There is a provision for students who may struggle to meet the hardware requirements to contact our IT Hardship team.

We will be pre-recording many sessions and recording any that are delivered live. This will allow you to access the material whenever is convenient for you. Additional written notes will also be provided, to help all students with self-directed learning and also to help the hearing-impaired.

The personal tutor system has been relatively ‘light touch’ in the two years it has run so far. However, we intend is to make regular meetings (whether by telephone or video conferencing) a requirement so that we can ensure you are supported as best as possible and maintain your connection to the university.

Risk assessment

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

Students with pre-existing illnesses or disabilities, or who are shielding

If you suffer, or have suffered, from a serious illness (physical or psychological) or have a disability, or have been required to shield due to Covid-19, please let us know. St George’s is committed to supporting our students and will explore all reasonable adjustments to support you to thrive on your course.

Please contact our Disability Advisor as soon as possible with details to help us establish whether your health history or disability is likely to affect your ability to study or practise. This will also give us sufficient time to carry out a detailed assessment, obtain reports and organise additional expert assessments if required.

Attendance at site

Most of our courses include elements of teaching for which you will be required to attend the University site. Attendance at these sessions will be essential to enable you to engage with the course and undertake assessments.

Placements

You will be required to undertake a personal risk assessment before you can attend any placement that is part of your course (or undertake certain other activities, such as those which include the practice of clinical skills or require the use of PPE). Where a health concern arises, every effort will be made to identify alternative placement arrangements, but your health and safety will be the first priority, and alternative arrangements may not be possible. This may have implications for the continuation of your study. If you are clinically vulnerable or have been shielding, we strongly encourage you to contact the Disability Advisor now to undertake an assessment.

Current students

Students with pre-existing illnesses or disabilities, or who are shielding

If you're a student with a pre-existing illness or disability, or who is shielding, your course team will contact you to ask if you would like to complete a personal risk assessment before you return to the site. If you suffer from a serious illness which may increase your level of risk, or have been required to shield due to Covid-19, we recommend that you complete a personal risk assessment. St George’s is committed to supporting our students and will explore all reasonable adjustments to support you to thrive on your course. 

Attendance at site

For the majority of our courses we will delivering an element of face to face, hands-on teaching on campus in line with social distancing guidelines which you are required to attend. If you will be unable to attend teaching on site due to a health reason, you must let us know by start of the academic year so we can consider alternative arrangements to ensure you progress through the course. Mitigating Circumstances can still be submitted for unforeseen illnesses; however, being unable to attend the site due to shielding or being at heightened risk from a pre-existing illness or disability will not be accepted as grounds for Mitigating Circumstances. Please discuss this with your course team and complete a personal risk assessment so that all reasonable adjustment can be made.

Placements 

You will be required to undertake a personal risk assessment before you can attend any placement (or undertake certain other activities, such as those including the practice of clinical skills or requiring the use of PPE) that is part of your course. Where a health concern arises, every effort will be made to identify alternative placements arrangements, but your health and safety will be the first priority, and where alternative arrangements are not possible, there may be implications for your studies. If you are clinically vulnerable or have been shielding, we strongly encourage you to contact your course team now to undertake a personal risk assessment.

Course length

At this stage, we expect to deliver the course within the planned timescales to enable full-time students to complete the programme in one academic year and part-time students to complete the programme in two academic years. All assessments can be completed and/or submitted remotely. 

The one assessment for which this is challenging is the roleplay assessment for the Introduction to Counselling Skills module. However, although remote assessment of this might not be ideal, it is possible (via a live video platform, such as MS Teams).

All taught modules which are scheduled for before Christmas will be delivered wholly online.  This affects five taught modules, three of which are core (so the vast majority of students will do these modules). The balance between seminars and directed self-learning will vary between modules, as appropriate. For example, the first module will include a significant number of live sessions because there isn’t time for students to do much pre-sessional work.

Unlike many courses, we still have to deliver all live, synchronous sessions on the dates advertised because we have students who are working full-time and will have booked that time off work to attend the module. Later modules will aim to have all material on the Canvas (virtual learning environment) pages and available to students two weeks before the first official teaching day of the module. You will be directed to complete certain tasks which will then feed into the synchronous teaching during that week – for example, the Omics Techniques and Technologies module will be structured five days of teaching with pre-recorded lectures in the mornings and live online workshops in the afternoons. All this material will be made available two weeks before the module starts, so you can go through all the lectures whenever you wish. You may choose to do so during those two weeks, or only be able to look at the material on the official teaching dates – but either way it will be available beforehand.

 

 

Additional costs

We do not expect students to incur any extra costs over and above those that we have advertised on the course page.

As a result of our courses beginning with the majority of teaching online, you will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online lectures. Information is available on recommended device specification. If you are worried you might struggle to meet these requirements, you should email IThardship@sgul.ac.uk so we can look at support options for you.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) will be provided for you if needed.

Assessment methods

We assess the knowledge, skills and attributes of our students in a variety of ways. Methods we use for assessing taught modules include online timed examinations (SBAs and SAQs), and open assessments which include critical essays, data analysis, and case reports. All of these assessments were already completed and/or submitted online via Canvas, and this will continue.

Projects are assessed via thesis, presentation, supervisors report and, in the case of 60-credit projects, initial proposal. Usually, the thesis is submitted online and as a hard copy, and the presentation is a face-to-face assessment with questions.

Award

No changes.

Location of study

All face-to-face teaching will take place at St George’s, University of London, on the campus that we share with St George’s Hospital in Tooting or at King’s College London’s London Bridge campus, with appropriate social distancing measures in place. We have not explored alternative locations for teaching and have no immediate plans to do so. If government advice on social distancing changes, we will consider ways in which we can deliver teaching on site in a manner that is safe for students and staff.

Consenting to these changes

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Incoming students (from September 2020)

The changes that we are making are the consequence of current public health advice, and our capacity to offer alternatives is limited by that advice. If you wish to avoid these changes by deferring your offer please contact admissions@sgul.ac.uk.

Current students

The changes that we are making are the consequence of current public health advice, and our capacity to offer alternatives is limited by that advice. You will be required to consent to these changes as part of your re-enrolment. If you wish to avoid these changes (e.g. by taking a year out from your studies) please discuss this directly with your course team in the first instance. We remain, as always, focused on the best experience and outcomes for our students.

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Duration

One year full-time, two years part-time

Application Deadline

01 June 2021

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