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Duration

Three years, full time

Application Deadline

15 January 2021

Location

St George's, University of London

UCAS Code

B210, institution code S49

Start dates

September 2021

Apply via UCAS

The field of clinical pharmacology is the study of all aspects of drugs as they relate to humans. St George’s Clinical Pharmacology BSc is designed to provide you with a broad understanding of how drugs are developed, from discovery of molecules to treatment of patients. Distinctively from any other course Clinical Pharmacology blends fundamental science concepts of physiology, pathophysiology and cellular mechanisms with applied topics of drug development, clinical trials, regulation of medicines and governance. It provides insight into wide ranging aspects of human-drug interactions, whic It will equip you with the knowledge and skills to enter a career in the life sciences, working in industry, academia or healthcare, particularly in the development of new medicines.

Studying on the Clinical Pharmacology BSc is an exciting learning experience, combining high-quality teaching and action learning - the best learning is by doing. Our unique teaching team has extensive experience in clinical pharmacology, from both science and healthcare backgrounds, and the friendly environment and great student support will help you be the best you can be. 

Read more information about our courses and university services terms and conditions.

Covid-19 updates

We won’t be making any significant changes to the content of our programmes, but there will be some changes to the way they are delivered. Please see the Covid-19 updates tab for further details of how this may affect this course for September 2020.

Clinical Pharmacology BSc Scholarship

To celebrate the third year of our Clinical Pharmacology BSc, we are offering all applicants who choose to study this pioneering course a £1,000 cash award to support living expenses and general studies.

To receive the cash award, you must enrol on the course in September 2021.

The cash award will be paid directly into your bank account in one instalment in December 2021. However, the cash award is subject to good attendance on the course.

Highlights

  • Exciting learning environment where science meets healthcare on a campus shared between the university and a top-rated teaching hospital.

  • Course designed with the advice of employers that will prepare you for the world of work.

  • Dedicated innovative course team always on hand to support students and act on their feedback.

  • Variety in teaching methods across multi-disciplinary modules caters to many learning styles.

  • Regular teaching from award-winning lecturers.

  • Work experience and research projects to explore your prospects and develop your skills.

  • Optional professional year between years 2 and 3 to develop your experience and CV.

  • Students graduate with a BSc in Clinical Pharmacology (Hons)

  • Personal development and careers advice to help you find your next steps after completing the course.

Emma Baker

Emma Baker

Course Director

Professor Baker is a clinical academic with roles in education, research and the NHS

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Iain Greenwood

Iain Greenwood

Course Director

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Jennifer Stott

Jennifer Stott

Lecturer

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Mark Preece

Mark Preece

Senior Lecturer

Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology with a strong educational background in the biomedical sciences

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Dagan Lonsdale

Dagan Lonsdale

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer and researcher in clinical pharmacology, consultant intensive care physician

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Christopher Threapleton

Christopher Threapleton

Module Leader

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Reviving clinical pharmacology: Professor Emma Baker

In a recent interview with the British Medical Journal, Emma Baker, Clinical Pharmacology Course Director, said her aim was to revive clinical pharmacology as a specialty. “In the 1970s, clinical pharmacology was an exciting specialty with important roles in clinical and experimental medicine and regulation,” she says.

“However, it became invisible in the 1980s with the advent of organ based medicine and integration of university departments. It started to recover in the early 2000s when it became apparent that prescribing education was otherwise lacking.” She says that we are now in “an age of enlightenment,” with a return to generalism and an increasing need to improve care for people with complex conditions on multiple drugs."

View the full article on the BMJ website

Clubs, Societies and Community Projects at St George's

Visit the Students' Union website

Tuition fees

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Home (UK) tuition fees

Academic Year

UK

Total fee*

2021/22

£9,250

£27,750

*Tuition fees for Home (UK) students are determined by UK Government Policy. Tuition fees are charged for each year of your course. Fees for second and subsequent years are likely to increase annually in line with UK inflation as measured by the Retail Price Index (RPI-X) and subject to maximum regulated fee rates set by the UK Government.

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

International (including EU) tuition fees

Academic Year

International

Total fee*

2021/22

£18,500

£55,500


*Tuition fees for international students are set by St George’s University of London. Tuition fees are charged for each year of your course. Fees for second and subsequent years are likely to increase annually in line with UK inflation as measured by the Retail Price Index (RPI-X) and will not normally increase by more than 5% each year, except when the rate of inflation is significantly more than that projected in the preceding year.

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

Additional costs

The following table gives you an indication of additional costs associated with your course.  These costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Item  Description
Technology requirements

Find out more about technology requirements associated with online learning.

“The course is delivered through interactive lectures, workshops, hospital and pharmacy visits, lab and dissection room sessions and more. The small cohort really allows you to develop friendships and a sense of camaraderie. Everyone is curious and hard-working and the course lecturers are funny, engaging and passionate. I highly recommend this course: you’ll learn, you’ll grow, you’ll enjoy it.”

- Maisha

First-year student

Apply now

“Studying clinical pharmacology has been one of the best choices I have made. The course is well-designed and hands-on, enabling you to understand the pathway of how a drug is developed, along with how it is administered and interactions of the drug in the body. Data and statistics also play an important part on the course, allowing you to develop your data handling skills which are very useful for employment in the field. The course is taught by passionate members of staff who lecture to a high standard and are always there to help.”

- Dilakshiga

First-year student

Read about our modules

With the exception of GCSEs, all qualifications must have been completed within the previous five years, including the year of application.

To be considered for this course, you will need to:

  • meet the GCSE requirement (or equivalent)

  • meet the A Level requirement (or equivalent)

  • meet the English language requirement

  • write a personal statement.

Entry requirements 2021

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GCSEs

Grades

Five subjects graded 6 (B) or above

Subject

Five subjects which must include English Language and Maths, and either Double Award Science or both Biology and Chemistry.

Additional information

We accept resits of GCSEs. We do not accept Adult Literacy and Numeracy or Functional Skills instead of GCSEs.

A Levels

 

Grades

ABB

Subjects

Must include Biology or Chemistry.

Contextual admissions

At St George’s, we want to attract students who share our mission to improve the health of society, regardless of their background. That’s why our Contextual Admissions schemes take into consideration additional information from your application, like the school you attended or the area you live in or if you have been in care, to make the admissions process fairer. Further details on Contextual Admissions are available here.

Additional information

Resits

We will consider your application if you are re-sitting your A Levels (including AS levels and modular resits) over 3 years. You will be required to meet the standard A Level grades. Any re-sit grades will supersede previous grades.

International Baccalaureate

Award

Full Award Diploma

Scores

Overall score of 34

Subjects

A minimum score of 16 points at Higher Level including either Biology or Chemistry must be achieved.

At Standard Level, a minimum score of 5 must be achieved in Maths (or Maths Studies) and English Language, if at least a 6 (B) grade has not previously been attained in GCSE/IGCSE/O Level Maths and English.

Access Diploma

Award

Full Award Diploma

Scores

60 credits at level 3 (45 graded and 15 ungraded)

Grades

Overall 27 credits must be graded at distinction and 18 at merit. Credits must be in pure science subjects,  excluding Sociology.

Additional information 

Any additional credits outside of the 60 credit diploma will not be accepted. You are required to have GCSEs in English Language and Maths alongside the Access Diploma as per the requirements outlined above.

Students studying an Access Diploma will need to provide a detailed transcript on completion.

Other qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma 

DDM in Applied Science

Cambridge Pre-U Diploma

D3, M2, M2
Combinations of individual Pre-U subjects and A Levels are acceptable.

Scottish Highers

Three Advanced Highers at ABB, including Chemistry or Biology.

European Baccalaureate

Overall grade of 80 per cent, with a minimum of 8 in Biology or Chemistry.

EU and international qualifications

Please contact us for details.

English language

If English is not your first language and you are not a national of a country deemed by either the UK Home Office or St George’s, University of London to be ‘majority English speaking’ listed here, you will be required to meet the English Language requirements outlined below. Tests are valid for a period of two years.

GCSE / IGCSE

English Language grade 6 (B) or above.

Please note: all components (speaking, listening, reading and writing) must be completed and assessed.

IELTS

(International English Language Testing System)

6.5 overall (including minimum 6.5 in Writing and a 6 in all other components).

You are able to take two attempts to achieve your IELTS qualification per year and your test results are valid for two years.

Other tests

Please see here.

Personal Statement

We are looking for students who are excited by science and motivated by curiosity and a desire to learn. A good understanding of biology and chemistry will provide the basis for building your knowledge in pharmacology. An interest in communication and team-working will help you to participate in the course and subsequently be successful in the scientific workplace.

As a guide your personal statement should tell us:

  • what interests you about pharmacology and what extra activities you have undertaken to support your interest in pharmacology or science in general

  • we are also interested in hearing about extra-curricular activities that have developed your team-working and communication skills and show how you can take initiative.

  • we also expect you to demonstrate awareness of current issues in pharmacology and science.

Please remember that your personal statement should focus on the subjects of pharmacology and science.

Clinical Pharmacology BSc is a modular, three-year degree course. You will study six main topics.

  • Fundamentals of science: the human biology needed to understand and learn pharmacology.

  • Pharmacokinetics: how the body handles drugs.

  • Pharmacodynamics: how drugs exert their effects on the body.

  • Drug development and clinical trials: how drugs are discovered and developed as medicines.

  • Drugs in healthcare: how information from clinical trials and drug development is used to guide the use of medicines for patients in clinical practice.

  • Statistics: how to analyse and interpret research data relating to drugs.

Each academic year comprises 120 credits. The tables below give an indication of the modules you will study in each year of the course and an outline of how the course will be assessed. Note that this may be subject to change.

Course structure

Year 1 has integrated learning involving all modules across both semesters.

Year 2 has integrated learning throughout the first semester (semester 3). This will be followed by study weeks and then exams. After this, students will complete a 4-week research project and 4 weeks of work experience.

Progression from year 1 and year 2 is dependent upon passing exams and course assessments, as well as sign off of a skills portfolio. Exit awards are available after successful completion of year 1 (Certificate in Clinical Pharmacology) and year 2 (Diploma in Clinical Pharmacology).

Year 3 has a modular structure involving a compulsory ‘hot topics in clinical pharmacology’ module and a literature-based research project. Students will choose additional modules to a total of 120 credits based on the interests and career aspirations they have developed in years 1 and 2.

Breakdown of year 3

In year 3, the course will be taught and assessed by modules. Modules are chunks of focussed learning. Each module is allocated a number of credits that relate to the amount of time to be spent teaching and learning on the module and the amount that that module counts to the overall mark for your degree. There are 120 credits for year 3.

Compulsory modules

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Hot topics in clinical pharmacology (30 credits)

This module will look at latest advances in therapeutics through the lens of the clinical pharmacology themes studied in years 1 and 2.

Research project (15 credits)

Students will select a research topic relating to some aspect of pharmacology. They will use the scientific literature to establish what is already known on the subject. They will develop a research question or hypothesis based on their findings and will design a study to investigate their hypothesis. They will write this up as a funding proposal for assessment. Projects may focus on laboratory or clinical science as they relate to pharmacology. Students should select one laboratory-focussed and one clinical-focussed topics for their two research projects (years 2 and 3).

Iain Greenwood

Iain Greenwood

Course Director

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Choice of one or two advanced clinical pharmacology modules

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Advanced pharmacokinetics (30 credits)

In this advanced module students will be taught basic computer techniques to ‘model’ pharmacokinetic processes from human data and learn to interpret these models. These techniques are used in drug development to help select the right dose of the drug.

Advanced drug development and clinical trials (30 credits)

In this advanced module students will develop more advanced knowledge and skills in clinical trials and drug development. They will learn about novel trial designs, trials using high risk drugs (e.g. for cancer), trials using novel therapies (e.g. nanomedicine, gene therapy) and how drugs are tested in children and pregnant women.

Advanced drugs in healthcare (30 credits)

In this advanced module students will learn more about how drugs are regulated and how organisations such as the national institute for healthcare excellence (NICE) and the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency (MHRA) influence the use of medicines. Students will learn how to pull lots of research studies together (systematic review) and how to interpret data from these big reviews (metaanalysis).

You will also have a choice of one to three optional 15 credit modules from a list of 6 (15 credits each).

Studying at St George's

At St George’s we offer a broad range of learning environments which include traditional lectures, tutorials, interactive workshops, laboratory and practical activities, workplace visits and web-based delivery. The modules which make up the course are assessed using a variety of different methods, enabling you to demonstrate your capabilities in a range of ways.

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Teaching and learning methods

We will use a variety of teaching and learning approaches to help you develop your knowledge and skills:

  • Hubs: In small tutor groups, you will explore your understanding of each week’s learning and develop your team working and presentation skills.
  • Interactive lectures: you will learn core information and key concepts and have the opportunity to test your understanding and ask questions.
  • Practical classes: you will learn clinical and laboratory research skills in weekly practical classes.
  • Computer workshops: each week you will work with data, some of which you will generate yourself in practical classes and through projects. You will learn how to use data to answer questions and how to do statistical analysis.
  • Workshops: These will use a combination of talks and team working to study key topics in more detail.
  • Drug-based learning: You will be set problems including clinical cases and research questions and find solutions to these in small groups.

Learning will be supported by excellent online course material and a strong teaching faculty. You will have a regular hub tutor to support your learning needs and a personal tutor for general support.

Assessment methods

How is the course planned and assessed?

The topics and skills are revisited several times over the three years of the course with increasing complexity to build your understanding and capabilities.

Year 1

This will give you a good introduction to and overview of each topic and a strong grounding in the skills you will need. You will be assessed by in-course quizzes, an end of year exam and the first stage of your skills portfolio.

Year 2

For the first half of the year you will study topics in more depth and build your skills, ending with an end of semester exam. For the second half of the year you will do a practical research project, build your workplace skills and spend time with employers. You will continue to develop your skills portfolio.

Professional year

There will be an option for a professional year between years 2 and 3 to develop your experience and CV.

Year 3

A ‘hot topics’ module about cutting edge drug developments, such as biological drugs, nanotechnology and gene therapy, and a written research project are compulsory. Otherwise you will choose modules that interest you and support your career plans. All year 3 modules are assessed by incourse assessment and exams. You will complete your portfolio and graduate with a skills certificate that demonstrates your competence to employers.

Teaching staff

Clinical Pharmacology course co-directors are Professor Emma Baker, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology, and Professor Iain Greenwood, Professor of Vascular Pharmacology.

Professor Baker is currently the Clinical Vice-President of the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) and is a member of the Clinical Pharmacology Skills Alliance. She is a National Teaching Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and has received many student-selected teaching awards.

Professor Greenwood was the inaugural recipient of the BPS Zaimis prize in 2017 for sustained commitment to the teaching of pharmacology at an outstanding level.

Other key course faculty include Dr Mark Preece, Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology, Dr Lila Mayahi, Consultant in Clinical Pharmacology, Dr Dan Burrage, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacology and Dr Chris Threapleton, Specialist Registrar in Clinical Pharmacology.

Clinical Pharmacology BSc has been designed with the specific aim of creating graduates who are ready for work or more advanced study in the life sciences, particularly in areas relating to the development and/or use of medicines.

You may consider careers in many areas including the following.

  • Industry: Potential employers include the pharmaceutical industry and contract research organisations. Clinical pharmacologists work on projects such as taking drugs that are proven to work in the laboratory and testing them in humans for the first time. They work on trials in volunteers and patients to find the right dose for new medicines and to test whether they work and are safe.

  • Healthcare: Clinical pharmacologists may work as research assistants or coordinators in clinical trials units or more generally in hospitals and GP practices, testing new medicines in patients. People with a BSc in Clinical Pharmacology are well equipped to apply for graduate-entry healthcare programmes such as medicine or pharmacy.

  • Academia: Clinical pharmacologists may work in university research laboratories, researching disease mechanisms and identifying treatment targets for new medicines. They could also go on to teach pharmacology to undergraduates on BSc courses.

  • Regulation: Potential employers include organisations such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the NHS. Clinical pharmacologists play an important role in pulling together information about drugs and in analysing data and writing reports to support healthcare professionals in making decisions to help patients.

For more information, download our Clinical Pharmacology careers brochure (PDF)

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Developing key skills

During the first two years of the course, you will learn about all areas of clinical pharmacology and identify areas that you find interesting. You will hear from experts working in industry, healthcare, academia and regulation and undertake short placements in each area. In year 3, you will be able to study one or two topics of clinical pharmacology in more depth, developing advanced knowledge and skills in areas you hope to work in in your future career. There will also be an option for you to undertake a professional year between years 2 and 3 to gain direct experience of working in industry, healthcare, academia or regulation.

The course will help you develop skills required for employment in the science sector. By the end of the course you will be confident at giving verbal presentations and will be able to write clearly in a scientific style. In particular you will be able to explain complicated ideas simply to non-specialist audiences and be able to make persuasive arguments. You will be able to write all sorts of scientific documents and will have practical skills in doing research in humans and in the laboratory. You will be able to collect data from human and laboratory experiments and enter it into a spreadsheet accurately and perform and report statistical analysis of that data. You will be able to do a critical review of scientific papers of different types. Throughout the course, you will collect evidence of competence in all these areas in a portfolio that you will be able to show to future employers.

Each student has a personal tutor to provide support and advice around career development. A careers programme will support you throughout the course, with workshops on topics such as writing a CV and developing interview skills. You will also be able to book a one-to-one appointment with the St George’s Careers Consultant to discuss all aspects of careers and employability. This might include investigating options and making career decisions, gaining advice and guidance on where to look for jobs, CV and application checking, or booking in for a practice interview. 

Register your interest for Clearing and Adjustment

Register now and we’ll keep you updated with information about Clearing and Adjustment at St George’s.

Covid-19 guidance

For information on applications, clearing, work experience and gap years, view our latest Covid-19 FAQs for prospective applicants.

Apply for this course through UCAS (the University and College Admissions Service) by 15 January in the year of entry. There are no upper age limits, so we welcome applications from mature students.

How to apply

Application checklist

You must provide the following.

  • Full details of your Level 2 (GCSE or equivalent) qualifications with grades.

  • Full details of your Level 3 (A Level or equivalent) qualifications with achieved/predicted grades.

  • A personal statement (more information about this document is available on the UCAS website). We recommend that you include in your statement a recognition that studying for a BSc in Physiotherapy will include practice and study in a number of settings.

  • An academic reference from your current or most recent institutions with predicted grades.

After submitting your application to UCAS:

  • log in to UCAS Track and make sure all your academic details have been included

  • if any subjects or predicted results are missing, email the Admissions Officer with your UCAS number and missing subjects and grades.

Deferred entry

We will consider applications from applicants who wish to defer entry by a year, provided you plan to use the time constructively. If you are offered a place on the course and subsequently decide to defer, you must inform us by 1 June of the year of application.

After application

We will send you an acknowledgement email and letter when we receive your application. Please make sure your email account is able to accept communications from St George’s as we will mainly communicate with you via email. Selected applicants will be invited to attend interview. Decisions from St George’s will be entered onto UCAS Track and direct applicants will be contacted via email.

We have been working hard to find ways to teach our courses without disruption, while keeping our staff and students safe and making sure we follow government guidance on Covid-19. We won’t be making any significant changes to the content of our programmes, but there will be some changes to the way they are delivered. Please see below for further details of how this may affect this course.

If government advice changes, we may need to update our plans. If we do so, we will update this information, and will keep current students and offer holders informed by email.

We will also continue to update our frequently asked questions page for applicants and offer holders and current students as more information becomes available.

Course content

The Clinical Pharmacology BSc degree only received its first cohort of students in September 2019, so this will be the first time that year 2 is delivered.

Year 1 will operate the same as in the previous academic year, with appropriate changes due to social distancing or online delivery in line with the present guidance. The number of modules has not changed, but content has been modified as a standard part of curriculum development for a new course.

Everything itemised in the course webpage and documents for year 2 will be implemented as planned unless a second wave of Covid-19 sparks further government changes to University operations.

Supporting vulnerable students

Students considered to be most at risk from Covid-19 should work at home wherever possible in line with government advice. Students who are going on placement will be required to complete an individual risk assessment and others may choose to do so. In addition, students from vulnerable groups, including care leavers, students estranged from their families and students with disabilities, are prioritised for help from the University’s Hardship Funds and for accommodation in Horton Halls. Priority for loans of laptops from the University will be given to those eligible to receive a hardship grant; those registered as disabled, care leavers or with caring responsibilities; and international students who may have difficulty sourcing an appropriate device on arrival in the UK.

We recognise the impact that the current circumstances may have on mental health and have expanded our counselling provision, offering remote appointments to any student. In addition, every student will be allocated a personal tutor to offer individual pastoral and academic support from the start of their studies. (Further information about health and wellbeing advice during Covid-19 is available here.)

Priority consideration has been given to support for students with disabilities when accessing teaching and learning online, through the provision of automatic live captioning and British Sign Language within our primary technologies of Panopto, MS Teams and Big Blue Button. These can benefit a range of students, especially those who are deaf or hard of hearing, as well as students with an Autistic Spectrum Condition (ASC), memory processing issues, and for whom English is an additional language.

Human-level captioning is also available where a need has been established through the Disability Advisory team. Human-level captioning requests are processed by the Learning Technology Services (LTS) section and can be requested by email to lts@sgul.ac.uk.  

We have canvassed options from all of the first cohort on their ability to use wifi/access content online. We have identified students that have serious issues with connectivity and have put these considerations on file for future tasks. The Course has been adapted to mainly asynchronous items that allow flexiblity in access. Any in course assessment has this flexibility built-in.

How the course will be delivered

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

The existing learning outcomes for our modules and courses will remain in place. From September to December 2020 all students will primarily access their learning, including learning materials, via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Canvas. Hands-on practical teaching and learning activities will be delivered on campus with appropriate social distancing and personal protective equipment (PPE) measures put in place, and with controls on the number of people in each location.

The online components of the course will be designed to balance interactive real-time sessions with lecturers and other students, with self-paced independent study. Students will have clear learning pathways through the activities they are expected to engage with, and there will be opportunities to check learning and progress.

Personal tutor support and all other student support, such as the Academic Success Centre, will also be online for this period, using a range of methods for staying in touch, such as telephone, email and the University’s web conferencing systems BigBlueButton and MSTeams.

Pending Health Education England (HEE) approval, placements are currently expected to resume from September 2020 with minimum changes to planned delivery or timings. All students on placement will be expected to undertake a risk assessment and adhere to local Trust working patterns and guidance.  

To get the most from online study, hardware requirements have been established and communicated to all existing students and offer holders. Students will need their own personal computer or laptop and an internet connection in their place of accommodation. This needs to be in place at the start of the course. Once enrolled, students will have the ability to use Office 365 as part of our institutional licence, and access software required for their modules/courses via AppsAnywhere. In addition, we offer Office for Mac via Ofice365, but only the following applications are available for Mac: Teams, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, OneNote. Web-based Office applications are available on Mac. Full details are available here. There is a provision for students who may struggle to meet the hardware requirements to contact our IT Hardship team.

The Clinical Pharmacology degree will use a hybrid delivery system involving both remote and face-to-face teaching. The course team has already adapted to this type of delivery for the last five weeks of the previous academic year.

Lectures and workshops will be delivered online as pre-recorded sessions, with two small group sessions run ‘live’ at the beginning and the end of the week. In addition, you will come to the campus to take part in laboratory practicals and clinical skills sessions. These will be operated with appropriate social distancing measures in line with government recommendations.

The sessions at St George’s will run on Mondays throughout the semester. We intend to hold a lab practical in the morning and clinical skills in the afternoon, to minimise your need to use public transport. You will also take part in a presentation skills workshop run by an external facilitator on campus.

We have designed this blend of online learning that can be done at your leisure, live small group sessions done online and physical attendance at St George’s, plus student discussion boards and Q&A, to optimise your experience in these strained times.

Current students

The existing learning outcomes for our modules and courses will remain in place. From September to December 2020 all students will primarily access their learning, including learning materials, via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Canvas. Hands-on practical teaching and learning activities will be delivered on campus with appropriate social distancing and personal protective equipment (PPE) measures put in place, and with controls on the number of people in each location.

The online components of the course will be designed to balance interactive real-time sessions with lecturers and other students, with self-paced independent study. Students will have clear learning pathways through the activities they are expected to engage with, and there will be opportunities to check learning and progress.

Personal tutor support and all other student support, such as the Academic Success Centre, will also be online for this period, using a range of methods for staying in touch, such as telephone, email and the University’s web conferencing systems BigBlueButton and MSTeams.

Pending Health Education England (HEE) approval, placements are currently expected to resume from September 2020 with minimum changes to planned delivery or timings. All students on placement will be expected to undertake a risk assessment and adhere to local Trust working patterns and guidance.  

To get the most from online study, hardware requirements have been established and communicated to all existing students and offer holders. Students will need their own personal computer or laptop and an internet connection in their place of accommodation. This needs to be in place at the start of the course. Once enrolled, students will have the ability to use Office 365 as part of our institutional licence, and access software required for their modules/courses via AppsAnywhere. In addition, we offer Office for Mac via Ofice365, but only the following applications are available for Mac: Teams, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, OneNote. Web-based Office applications are available on Mac. Full details are available here. There is a provision for students who may struggle to meet the hardware requirements to contact our IT Hardship team.

You will have become used to online delivery of lectures, workshops and small groups in your first year. For year 2 the online activities you experienced in year 1 will continue, but you will come on to the campus for practicals and clinical skills sessions. These will be organised with appropriate social distancing and hand-washing measures. In the second semester (from March) you will do a research project for six weeks, followed by industrial experience. Covid-19 considerations are being built into these activities.

Exams will be developed as open-book questions, and you will be given plenty of formative experience throughout the first semester of year 2.

Course length

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

We are expecting to deliver the course within the planned timescales, and for students to progress and graduate without delay.

Although some assessments are designed to be taken on site, we have developed an alternative strategy allowing assessments to be completed remotely without coming on to campus.

However, this programme does include practical elements that are delivered in laboratories, clinical cubicles and in our Dissection Room. These will run as planned in 2020/21 with appropriate social distancing measures in place. 

There is a possibility that government advice on social distancing may change. If that is the case, we will endeavour to delay practical components of the programme to a subsequent semester (or year) to protect the safety of our students.

Current students

We are planning to deliver the course within the planned timescales, and for students to progress and graduate without delay.

Although some assessments are designed to be taken on site, we have developed an alternative strategy allowing assessments to be completed remotely without coming on to campus.

However, this programme does include a research project, which may be delivered in laboratories. This will run as planned in 2020/21 with appropriate social distancing measures in place. Our capacity to do so may change if government guidelines change. However, we will strive to ensure that alternative arrangements are in place to enable you to complete on schedule, including the use of previously acquired data from supervisors or data banks.

We are currently intending to put all students into a workplace experience for five weeks in May 2021. This will occur only if the company completes a risk assessment and can assure effective social distancing. Our ability to obtain placements may be affected by Covid-19 and we have contingency plans involving seminars from different company employees to provide industrial experience. We do not intend to delay placements if we can avoid it, as this could impact on students’ ability to complete the course and graduate on schedule. 

Additional costs

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

We do not expect students to incur any extra costs over and above those that we have advertised on the course page.

As a result of our courses beginning with the majority of teaching online, you will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online lectures. Information is available on recommended device specification. If you are worried you might struggle to meet these requirements, you should email IThardship@sgul.ac.uk so we can look at support options for you.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) will be provided for you if needed.

Current students

We do not expect students to incur any extra costs over and above the normal level, as previously advertised on the course page.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) will be provided for you if needed.

Assessment methods

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

We assess the knowledge, skills and attributes of our students in a variety of ways. One method that was deemed very successful by the previous cohort is a weekly quiz on the past week’s learning material, held in a small group session with your personal tutor and about eight other students. These cover all six modules and provide the majority of the in-course assessment.

There will also be other forms of in course assessment that will assess the your ability to handle numbers and apply statistical analysis. The course involves a lot of peer review (students rating their colleagues), and this makes your development and progress more manageable.

At the end of the Christmas and Easter terms there is a larger quiz in the same format as the weekly ones. This reinforces your understanding and builds confidence.

All formal written examinations take place in June. At this stage, we expect to deliver these assessments as planned. Although some assessments are designed to be taken on site, St George’s successfully developed an alternative assessment strategy in 2019/20 to enable students to complete assessments remotely and without coming on to campus. Regardless of the assessment format, all students will receive considerable practice at exam questions so they feel comfortable undertaking these assignments.

Current students

You will already be used to the weekly quizzes and end of term ‘big quizzes’. These will continue throughout the first semester of Year 2. At the end of the semester, you will sit exam papers either on-site or via online methods. As the exam format will be new to you, you will receive plenty of formative exercises to get familiar with the question type and how to answer exam questions effectively.

In the second semester of year 2, you will do a research project that will assessed by writing a project outline and a short research paper. Neither will be affected by the adaptions to Covid-19. The final assessment will be an oral PowerPoint presentation. Currently, we expect this to be delivered on site. If there is a second Covid-19 wave and government advice changes, we will use appropriate online methods.

Award

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

The first year of the degree does not contribute to the final degree class, so any Covid-19 changes will not affect your degree classification.

The BSc Clinical Pharmacology programme is not accredited and so any changes that we are making will have no bearing on the qualification.

Current students

We do not expect any changes to the programme will affect any student’s final degree classification.

The BSc Clinical Pharmacology programme is not accredited and so the changes that we are making will have no bearing on the qualification.

Location of study

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Incoming students (starting September 2020)

All face-to-face teaching will take place at St George’s, University of London, on the campus that we share with St George’s Hospital in Tooting, with appropriate social distancing measures in place. We have not explored alternative locations for teaching and have no immediate plans to do so. If government advice on social distancing changes, we will consider ways in which we can deliver teaching on site in a manner that is safe for students and staff.

Current students

All face-to-face teaching will take place at St George’s, University of London, on the campus that we share with St George’s Hospital in Tooting, with appropriate social distancing measures in place. We have not explored alternative locations for teaching and have no immediate plans to do so. If government advice on social distancing changes, we will consider ways in which we can deliver teaching on site in a manner that is safe for students and staff.

For the industrial placements, providers will undertake an appropriate risk assessment and you will be allocated a position depending upon a combination of personal circumstances and career aspirations.

Consenting to these changes

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Incoming students (from September 2020)

The changes that we are making are the consequence of current public health advice, and our capacity to offer alternatives is limited by that advice. If you wish to avoid these changes by deferring your offer please contact admissions@sgul.ac.uk.

Current students

The changes that we are making are the consequence of current public health advice, and our capacity to offer alternatives is limited by that advice. You will be required to consent to these changes as part of your re-enrolment. If you wish to avoid these changes (e.g. by taking a year out from your studies) please discuss this directly with your course team in the first instance. We remain, as always, focused on the best experience and outcomes for our students.

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Duration

Three years, full time

Application Deadline

15 January 2021

UCAS Code

B210, institution code S49

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