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Duration

Three years, full time

Application Deadline

Applications are still being accepted through UCAS

Location

St George's, University of London

UCAS Code

B210, institution code S49

Start dates

September 2021

Apply via UCAS

Overview

This degree is the only undergraduate course dedicated to Clinical Pharmacology. We take a holistic view of the development of drugs: from understanding disease processes and identifying possible drug targets, to organising testing, rolling out clinical trials, negotiating complex regulations and licensing and finally, treating patients and potentially saving lives. The course blends clinical and fundamental sciences with an innovative integrated approach.

Designed in collaboration with industry, our course prepares you for employment from the outset with a focus on developing core skills in leadership, organisation, communication, teamwork, academic integrity and more. You’ll relate your learning to real-life through case studies and practical activities, which in 2020 included our students assisting with the running and management of COVID testing of students across the University.

Every student spends six weeks on industry-related work experience in Year 2.  This is in large part thanks to our excellent professional links with the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), regulatory bodies, contract research organisations and major pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical companies, such as AstraZeneca, Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline. In addition, students undertake an extensive lab-based or clinically-focused research project for six weeks.

£1,000 cash award for 2021/22 applicants

To celebrate the third year of our Clinical Pharmacology BSc, we are offering all applicants who choose to study this pioneering course a £1,000 cash award to support living expenses and general studies.

To be eligible for the cash award, you must enrol on the course in September 2021. (There is no additional application process, everyone who applies and is made an offer on the course is automatically eligible for the award.)

The cash award will be paid directly into your bank account in one instalment in December 2021. However, it is subject to good attendance on the course.

There are no restrictions on how you can spend the cash award, but it is intended for your studies, course materials and general living expenses.

We may be able to provide you with additional funding in addition to the cash award, find out more about the financial support we have available.

Highlights

  • ABC
  • Taught by experienced practising clinicians and scientists. Many of our course team are involved with research and clinical trials associated with the fight against COVID

  • Our lecturers are praised by students for being friendly, supportive and for their innovative teaching methods which blend traditional lectures and seminars with skills workshops, practical sessions and work experience.

  • Course focused on graduate employability – every one of our students undertakes a research project and spends six weeks on industry work experience in the second year, after which you have the opportunity to spend an additional professional year on placement in industrial, clinical or other settings

  • Established in 1752, St George’s, University of London is the UK’s specialist health university.We are the only UK university to share our campus with a major teaching hospital, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, helping to build your multidisciplinary understanding and context.

  • SGUL’s Clinical Pharmacology BSc Scholarship offers new students who enrol in September 2021 a £1,000 cash award to support living expenses and general studies.

Course info

Improving patient care through the safe and effective use of medicines, clinical pharmacologists are in high demand and have been described by the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) as ‘one of four scientists that save the world every day’. Clinical pharmacologists are needed now more than ever before as we race to find new drugs and vaccines in the fight against COVID.

Our unique degree was developed with feedback from industry, including representatives from AstraZeneca, Syneos Health, Allergan, Niche Science and Technology, and the Experimental Medicine Expert Network, a group of clinical pharmacology scientists from a wide range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies and contract research organisations.

You will be taught by highly respected, leading experts in the field of clinical pharmacology, all of whom are active research scientists and/or front-line clinicians who maintain excellent links with industry.

Preparing you for future employment through a blend of knowledge, theory, skills development and practical experience, it offers a comprehensive study of the exciting, ever-changing field of applied clinical pharmacology, from the discovery of disease to development of drugs.

With early opportunities for all students to participate in research and work experience, teaching is linked to real-life practice at every stage to provide a broad understanding of the wide-ranging aspects of the design, testing, application and interaction of drugs.

You will deepen your knowledge of the human body and fundamentals of science through practical sessions in our anatomy and dissection rooms. Drug-based learning scenarios provide real-life context and cases which demonstrate how the body handles drugs (pharmacokinetics) and how drugs exert their effects on the body (pharmacodynamics), for instance, how the effects of medication vary greatly  depending on the patient’s age and physicality.

You will develop a wide range of skills applied in the development of new medicines, learning how to set up and interpret experiments, run clinical trials or handle, analyse and present data and findings. In November 2020, our students had an unprecedented opportunity to help run the University COVID testing centre. They were divided into two teams: an offsite team that managed the project; and an onsite team that ran the actual testing and processing of samples. Read more about their experience here.

St George’s University of London is the UK’s only university dedicated to medical and health sciences education, training and research. We share our site with a major London teaching hospital which is both on the clinical frontline for a diverse local community and a centre of excellence for specialist conditions.

“The course is delivered through interactive lectures, workshops, hospital and pharmacy visits, lab and dissection room sessions and more. The small cohort really allows you to develop friendships and a sense of camaraderie. Everyone is curious and hard-working and the course lecturers are funny, engaging and passionate. I highly recommend this course: you’ll learn, you’ll grow, you’ll enjoy it.”

- Maisha

First-year student

Apply now

“Studying clinical pharmacology has been one of the best choices I have made. The course is well-designed and hands-on, enabling you to understand the pathway of how a drug is developed, along with how it is administered and interactions of the drug in the body. Data and statistics also play an important part on the course, allowing you to develop your data handling skills which are very useful for employment in the field. The course is taught by passionate members of staff who lecture to a high standard and are always there to help.”

- Dilakshiga

First-year student

Read about our modules

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Tuition fees

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Home (UK) tuition fees

Academic Year

UK

Total fee*

2022/23

£9,250

£27,750

*Tuition fees for Home (UK) students are determined by UK Government Policy. Tuition fees are charged for each year of your course. Fees for second and subsequent years are likely to increase annually in line with UK inflation as measured by the Retail Price Index (RPI-X) and subject to maximum regulated fee rates set by the UK Government.

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

International (including EU) tuition fees

Academic Year

International

Total fee*

2022/23

£19,250

£57,750


*Tuition fees for international students are set by St George’s University of London. Tuition fees are charged for each year of your course. Fees for second and subsequent years are likely to increase annually in line with UK inflation as measured by the Retail Price Index (RPI-X) and will not normally increase by more than 5% each year, except when the rate of inflation is significantly more than that projected in the preceding year.

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

Additional costs

The following table gives you an indication of additional costs associated with your course.  These costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Item  Description
Technology requirements

Find out more about technology requirements associated with online learning.

Clubs, Societies and Community Projects at St George's

Visit the Students' Union website
Our entry requirements for 2021 entry and 2022 entry may differ. Please scroll down if you would like to view our 2022 entry criteria.

Entry criteria: 2021 entry

With the exception of GCSEs, all qualifications must have been completed within the previous five years, including the year of application.

To be considered for this course, you will need to:

  • meet the GCSE requirement (or equivalent)

  • meet the A Level requirement (or equivalent)

  • meet the English language requirement

  • write a personal statement.

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GCSEs

 

Grades

Five subjects graded 6 (B) or above

Subject

Five subjects which must include English Language and Maths, and either Double Award Science or both Biology and Chemistry.

Additional information

We accept resits of GCSEs. We do not accept Adult Literacy and Numeracy or Functional Skills instead of GCSEs.

A Levels

 

Grades

ABB

Subjects

Must include Biology or Chemistry.

Contextual admissions

At St George’s, we want to attract students who share our mission to improve the health of society, regardless of their background. That’s why our Contextual Admissions schemes take into consideration additional information from your application, like the school you attended or the area you live in or if you have been in care, to make the admissions process fairer. Further details on Contextual Admissions are available here.

Additional information

Resits

We will consider your application if you are re-sitting your A Levels (including AS levels and modular resits) over 3 years. You will be required to meet the standard A Level grades. Any re-sit grades will supersede previous grades. For 2021 entry, exams taken as resits in October 2020, in place of cancelled exams in summer 2019, will count within the 3 year period. Exams taken for the first time in October 2020 are not considered to be resits.

International Baccalaureate

 

Award

Full Award Diploma

Scores

Overall score of 34

Subjects

A minimum score of 16 points at Higher Level including either Biology or Chemistry must be achieved.

At Standard Level, a minimum score of 5 must be achieved in Maths (or Maths Studies) and English Language, if at least a 6 (B) grade has not previously been attained in GCSE/IGCSE/O Level Maths and English.

Access Diploma

 

Award

Full Award Diploma

Scores

60 credits at level 3 (45 graded and 15 ungraded)

Grades

Overall 27 credits must be graded at distinction and 18 at merit. Credits must be in pure science subjects,  excluding Sociology.

Additional information 

Any additional credits outside of the 60 credit diploma will not be accepted. You are required to have GCSEs in English Language and Maths alongside the Access Diploma as per the requirements outlined above.

Students studying an Access Diploma will need to provide a detailed transcript on completion.

Other qualifications

 

Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma 

DDM in Applied Science

Cambridge Pre-U Diploma

D3, M2, M2
Combinations of individual Pre-U subjects and A Levels are acceptable.

Scottish Highers

Three Advanced Highers at ABB, including Chemistry or Biology.

European Baccalaureate

Overall grade of 80 per cent, with a minimum of 8 in Biology or Chemistry.

EU and international qualifications

We welcome applications from applicants around the world. For information on the requirements for your country, please visit our International Qualifications page.

English language

If English is not your first language and you are not a national of a country deemed by either the UK Home Office or St George’s, University of London to be ‘majority English speaking’ listed here, you will be required to meet the English Language requirements outlined below. Tests are valid for a period of two years.

GCSE / IGCSE

English Language grade 6 (B) or above.

Please note: all components (speaking, listening, reading and writing) must be completed and assessed.

IELTS

(International English Language Testing System)

6.5 overall (including minimum 6.5 in Writing and a 6 in all other components).

You are able to take two attempts to achieve your IELTS qualification per year and your test results are valid for two years.

Other tests

Please see here.

Personal statement

We are looking for students who are excited by science and motivated by curiosity and a desire to learn. A good understanding of biology and chemistry will provide the basis for building your knowledge in pharmacology. An interest in communication and team-working will help you to participate in the course and subsequently be successful in the scientific workplace.

As a guide your personal statement should tell us:

  • what interests you about pharmacology and what extra activities you have undertaken to support your interest in pharmacology or science in general

  • we are also interested in hearing about extra-curricular activities that have developed your team-working and communication skills and show how you can take initiative.

  • we also expect you to demonstrate awareness of current issues in pharmacology and science.

Please remember that your personal statement should focus on the subjects of pharmacology and science.

Entry criteria: 2022 entry

To be eligible for the Clinical Pharmacology BSc programme, you must meet the requirements outlined under Entry Qualifications, Other Academic Requirements, and Non-academic Requirements below.

Entry Qualifications

With the exception of GCSEs, all qualifications must have been completed within the previous five years, including the year of application.

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A Levels

If you are applying on the basis of A Levels, you must meet both the A Level and GCSE requirements below.

Grades

BBB

Subjects

Including Biology or Chemistry

Contextual admissions

At St George’s, we want to attract students who share our mission to improve the health of society, regardless of their background. That’s why our Contextual Admissions schemes take into consideration additional information from your application, like the school you attended or the area you live in or if you have been in care, to make the admissions process fairer. Further details on Contextual Admissions are available here.

Additional information

Resits may be considered.

GCSEs

Grades

Five subjects graded 6 (B) or above

Subjects

Five subjects which must include English Language, Maths and Science (Double or Triple Award).

Additional information

We accept resits of GCSEs. We do not accept Adult Literacy and Numeracy or Functional Skills instead of GCSEs.

International Baccalaureate

If you are applying on the basis of International Baccalaureate, you need to meet both our Higher Level and Standard Level requirements, as outlined below.

Award

Full Award Diploma

Scores

Overall score of 32

Subjects

15 points at Higher Level, including a minimum grade 5 in Biology or Chemistry.

At Standard Level, a minimum score of 5 must be attained in Maths and English, if at least a 6 (B) has not previously been attained in GCSE/IGCSE Maths and English. We accept both Mathematics: analysis & approaches and Mathematics: applications & interpretations. 

Access Diploma

If you are applying on the basis of an Access Diploma, you must meet both the Access Diploma and GCSE requirements below.

Award

Full award diploma (science subject)

Scores

60 credits at level 3 (45 graded and 15 ungraded)

Subjects

27 credits at Distinction and 18 credits at Merit. Credits must be in pure science subjects, excluding Sociology.

Additional information

Any additional level 3 credits outside of the 60 credit diploma will not be accepted.

GCSEs

Grades

Two subjects graded 6 (B) or above

Subjects

English Language and Maths

Additional information

We accept resits of GCSEs. We do not accept Adult Literacy and Numeracy or Functional Skills instead of GCSEs.

Other UK Qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

If you are applying on the basis of a Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma, you must meet both the Diploma and GCSE requirements below.

DDM

Must be in Applied Science.

Five GCSEs at grade 6 (B) or above. Subjects must include English Language, Maths and Science (Double or Triple Award).

Cambridge Pre-U Diploma

If you are applying on the basis of a Cambridge Pre-U Diploma, you must meet both the Diploma and GCSE requirements below.

M2, M2, M2

Three principal subjects to include Biology or Chemistry.

Five GCSEs at grade 6 (B) or above. Subjects must include English Language, Maths and Science (Double or Triple Award).

Scottish Highers

If you are applying on the basis of Scottish Highers, you must meet the Highers, Advanced Highers and National 5 requirements below.

Highers: BBB including Biology or Chemistry

Advanced Highers: BB including Biology or Chemistry

English Language and Maths National 5 at grade B

International Qualifications

We welcome applications from applicants around the world. For information on the requirements for your country, please visit our International Qualifications page.

Other Academic Requirements

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English Language

If you are applying from outside of the UK, you will need to meet the English language requirements outlined here. This is a group 2 course.

Non-academic Requirements

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Personal Statement

We are looking for students who are excited by science and motivated by curiosity and a desire to learn. A good understanding of Biology and Chemistry will provide the basis for building your knowledge in pharmacology. An interest in communication and team-working will help you to participate in the course and subsequently be successful in the scientific workplace.

As a guide your personal statement should tell us:

  • What interests you about pharmacology and what extra activities you have undertaken to support your interest in pharmacology or science in general
  • We are also interested in hearing about extra-curricular activities that have developed your team-working and communication skills and show how you can take initiative.
  • We also expect you to demonstrate awareness of current issues in pharmacology and science.

Please remember that your personal statement should focus on the subjects of pharmacology and science.

The curriculum is based around seven core modules. These modules run alongside each other throughout the course, allowing you to understand topics from different perspectives and reinforce your learning. Your knowledge and skills in these topics will develop progressively through the course.

  • Fundamentals of science: understanding how the body works and what goes wrong in disease.

  • Pharmacokinetics: how the body handles drugs.

  • Pharmacodynamics: how drugs exert their effects on the body.

  • Drug development and clinical trials: how drugs are discovered and developed as medicines.

  • Drugs in healthcare: how information from clinical trials and drug development is used to guide the use of medicines for patients in clinical practice.

  • Data and statistics: how to collect, manage, analyse, present and interpret research data relating to drugs.

  • Skills porfolio: developing clinical trials, laboratory, presentation and personal skills required to be successful in a work environment and demonstrate this to employers.

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Year 1

In the first semester, you will be introduced to a broad spectrum of concepts across the seven modules. In the second semester, your focus turns to key drug targets, including inflammatory, infectious, cardiovascular and metabolic disease. You will look at each topic from the perspective of the different modules and accompany your theoretical learning with clinical and laboratory practicals, workshops and data analysis.

Throughout the course, you will be developing skills that will be imminently transferrable to future employment. In the first year, for example, developing both presentation and communication skills, you work in teams to prepare and make the case for a new drug. This includes pitching your ideas to a ‘Dragons’ Den’ style panel of judges, which has previously included St George’s Principal and industry representatives.

Year 2

In Semester 3 (the first semester of Year 2) you will continue your learning about key drug targets, focussing on neurological and psychiatric disease, cancer, reproduction, paediatrics and old age. You will develop your knowledge and skills around clinical trials design, data handling and pharmacokinetics. Weekly careers workshops help you find out about all the options open to you on completing the degree to help you select projects, placements and Year 3 modules.

Year 2 exams are at the end of Semester 3, so you can focus for the rest of the year on gaining practical experience. In the first half of semester 4, you will undertake a practical research project that will give you experience of clinical- or laboratory-based research. You will present the results of your study in a scientific symposium and write it up as a research paper. You will then spend six weeks gaining valuable work experience in industry, expanding your professional network and making vital contacts. Companies that have agreed to take students for the current academic year include Glaxo Smith Kline, Roche, Niche Scientific, Airfinity and HelloBio. For example, students placed with Covance, a world-leading Life Sciences Contract Research Organisation, will rotate through departments organising clinical trials, lab and regulatory work.

At the end of your second year, you can also choose to take a ‘professional year’, applying for a placement in industry to develop your experience and enhance your CV, capitalising on our excellent links across the sector.

Year 3

In the final year, you will look at latest advances and ‘hot topics’, including new therapeutic approaches to disease and cutting-edge drug developments, such as biological drugs, nanotechnology and gene therapy. You will use your career plans and experience to choose course modules to study to a more advanced level. Year 3 includes a written research project, where you get the chance to write a funding proposal or business case

Modules

Clinical Pharmacology BSc is a modular, three-year degree course. You will study six main topics.

  • Fundamentals of science: the human biology needed to understand and learn pharmacology.

  • Pharmacokinetics: how the body handles drugs.

  • Pharmacodynamics: how drugs exert their effects on the body.

  • Drug development and clinical trials: how drugs are discovered and developed as medicines.

  • Drugs in healthcare: how information from clinical trials and drug development is used to guide the use of medicines for patients in clinical practice.

  • Statistics: how to analyse and interpret research data relating to drugs.

Each academic year comprises 120 credits. The tables below give an indication of the modules you will study in each year of the course and an outline of how the course will be assessed. Note that this may be subject to change.

You will also have a choice of one to three optional 15 credit modules from a list of 6 (15 credits each).

Compulsory modules

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Hot topics in clinical pharmacology (30 credits)

This module will look at latest advances in therapeutics through the lens of the clinical pharmacology themes studied in years 1 and 2.

Research project (15 credits)

Students will select a research topic relating to some aspect of pharmacology. They will use the scientific literature to establish what is already known on the subject. They will develop a research question or hypothesis based on their findings and will design a study to investigate their hypothesis. They will write this up as a funding proposal for assessment. Projects may focus on laboratory or clinical science as they relate to pharmacology. Students should select one laboratory-focussed and one clinical-focussed topics for their two research projects (years 2 and 3).

Choice of one or two advanced clinical pharmacology modules

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Advanced pharmacokinetics (30 credits)

 

 

In this advanced module students will be taught basic computer techniques to ‘model’ pharmacokinetic processes from human data and learn to interpret these models. These techniques are used in drug development to help select the right dose of the drug.

Advanced drug development and clinical trials (30 credits)

In this advanced module students will develop more advanced knowledge and skills in clinical trials and drug development. They will learn about novel trial designs, trials using high risk drugs (e.g. for cancer), trials using novel therapies (e.g. nanomedicine, gene therapy) and how drugs are tested in children and pregnant women.

Advanced drugs in healthcare (30 credits)

In this advanced module students will learn more about how drugs are regulated and how organisations such as the national institute for healthcare excellence (NICE) and the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency (MHRA) influence the use of medicines. Students will learn how to pull lots of research studies together (systematic review) and how to interpret data from these big reviews (metaanalysis).

Placement

All students will undertake six weeks of work experience in industry during the second year of the course. This will give you the opportunity to find out more about what it takes to be successful in the workplace and what you might want to do after this degree.

In 2021, some of the employers who are offering work experience to our students include:

  • Pharmaceutical companies – Astra Zeneca, Roche, Ono, GSK

  • Contract research organisations – Covance, Niche Pharmaceuticals, Richmond Pharmacology, Simbec Orion

  • Pharmacovigilance and regulatory affairs – Boyd Consultants,

  • Research companies – HelloBio, Airfinity, Eurofins clinical diagnostics.

In addition to the guaranteed six weeks’ work experience, you will have the optional opportunity to apply for an external professional year. The application process for a professional year is to individual companies who advertise their opportunities and is competitive. If successful, you would undertake the professional year between Years 2 and 3.

The supervised, hands-on experience you get with both types of placements is an excellent way to consolidate your learning and makes you extremely attractive to employers on graduation. You will gain experience of working as part of a team, demonstrating professional behaviour. You will be supervised and mentored by experienced professionals and receive support from a University tutor.

Our course is unusual in offering ALL students work experience, as well as supporting the additional professional year in those who are interested.

At St George’s we offer a broad range of learning environments which include traditional lectures, tutorials, interactive workshops, practical activities, and web-based delivery. The co-location of the University with a major hospital provides a unique opportunity to study and work alongside the full range of clinical professionals and their patients.

Studying on the Clinical Pharmacology BSc is an exciting learning experience, combining high-quality teaching and action learning or ‘learning by doing’, which we believe is the best way to learn. Each week, for example, you will learn clinical and laboratory research skills in practical classes. In ‘drug-based learning’ sessions you will work in small groups to solve clinical cases and research problems, for example, investigating the fictional case of footballer ‘Sydney Bafferman’ who collapses due to a cardiac abnormality, or working through a simulated experiment with researcher ‘Lorelei Sims’ to find out what she did wrong.

Our course includes lots of opportunities to find out more about careers that you could enter after this degree. Early in the course lecturers will be given by guest researchers or healthcare professionals. You will meet patients in workshops and have the chance to go on healthcare visits to hospital wards and pharmacy. In our regular careers series professionals discuss what it is like to work in different areas, such as pharmaceutical companies, contract research organisations, clinical trials units, healthcare, hospital management, or regulatory affairs.  Speakers this year have included the Vice President, Medical at Covance, Clinical Pharmacology Services and the Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at Boyd Consultants, a specialised drug development consultancy that supports the development of medicines for patient benefit. Later in the course all students will have six weeks’ work experience in industry and gain practical research experience.

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Our expertise

Current students praise our friendly learning environment and the support they receive from the teaching team, who share their extensive experience as active research scientists and/or front-line clinicians with excellent industry connections.

Our course is led by Professor Emma Baker, currently the Clinical Vice President, a Fellow of the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) and London’s Training Programme Director for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and Professor Iain Greenwood, also a BPS Fellow, who is a former Vice-President for External Affairs of the Society and has previously acted as editor for the British Journal of Pharmacology.

Assessment methods

The modules and skills are revisited several times over the three years of the course with increasing complexity to build your understanding and capabilities, tested through various and innovative forms of assessment. In Year 1, you will be assessed by in-course quizzes, an end-of-year exam and compilation of a skills portfolio. Year 2 assessment includes in-course quizzes, an end-of-semester 3 exam and research project paper, and continued development of your skills portfolio. Progress on all Year 3 modules is evaluated by exams and in-course assessment, including oral and poster presentations, critical appraisals, lab reports and a research project grant proposal. You will complete your skills portfolio to earn a skills certificate to demonstrate your competence and skills to employers.

Emma Baker

Emma Baker

Course Director

Professor Baker is a clinical academic with roles in education, research and the NHS

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Iain Greenwood

Iain Greenwood

Course Director

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Jennifer Stott

Jennifer Stott

Lecturer

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Mark Preece

Mark Preece

Senior Lecturer

Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology with a strong educational background in the biomedical sciences

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Dagan Lonsdale

Dagan Lonsdale

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer and researcher in clinical pharmacology, consultant intensive care physician

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Christopher Threapleton

Christopher Threapleton

Module Leader

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While the St George’s programmes are recognised by many different countries, applicants are advised to check with their own individual national authorities if they wish to practise in their chosen country.

Industry-focused and with a view to getting you work-ready on graduation, our Clinical Pharmacology degree encompasses a broad spectrum of concepts and solutions – from understanding disease processes and identification of potential new drug targets to organising and running clinical trials, drug regulation and use in the community.

It has been purposefully designed with input from employers to ensure you develop the general and specialist skills they require, helping you stand out in the job market. On graduation, you will receive a certificate which you can present to your employer to demonstrate competency in core transferrable skills, including oral and poster presentation, scientific writing, teamwork and peer observation, in addition to essential laboratory and clinical skills.

Every step of your learning journey offers exciting employment possibilities, however, the six-week placement we provide every student in Year 2 provides particularly valuable workplace experience, making you highly attractive to employers. We work with dozens of small and large companies which span the full gamut of sector activities, including regulatory writing and clinical project management (e.g. Niche Pharmaceuticals), preclinical and clinical lab services (e.g. Charles River), regulatory affairs (e.g. DLRC) or medical communications (Chameleon).

Throughout the course, you will also learn about the culture and wide range of activities encompassed by Clinical Pharmacology from experts working in the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare, academia and regulation. Recent external contributors to the course include: Dr David Carlisle (Clinical Pharmacologist, Roche Pharmaceuticals), Dr Edd Humphries (Senior Research Scientist, Astra Zeneca), Dr Mark Bruce (Senior Director, Head of Translational Science and Drug Safety, ONO PHARMA UK), Chloe Bryan (Senior Clinical Research Associate, Quality Regulatory and Clinical Consultancy, Cambridge), Tim Hardman (Managing Director, Niche Science and Technology). External speakers contribute to module lectures e.g. on pharmacokinetics, drug development, drugs in healthcare, and through careers talks and panels.

After completing your degree you could go on to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, managing drug trials or working in the laboratory for one of the many pharmaceutical companies or contract research organisations, or assist with research and test medicines on patients in clinical trials units, hospitals or GP practices. Potential employers include the NHS and many professional and regulatory organisations, such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) or Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Alternatively, you could follow an academic route: teaching or researching disease mechanisms and identifying treatment targets for new medicines; or seek employment in the fields of scientific publishing, journalism, marketing and sales.

For more information on the range of career options, download our Clinical Pharmacology careers brochure (PDF). Should you wish to undertake further study or research at St George’s, you will be well equipped to apply for graduate-entry programmes, such as medicine or pharmacy.

Careers

  • Academia (teaching or research)
  • Bioanalytical company
  • Biomedical company
  • Biotechnical company
  • Clinical trials unit – industry or healthcare
  • Contract research organisation
  • Large pharmaceutical company
  • Publications house
  • Regulatory affairs

Facilities

St George’s is the only UK university, which specialises in healthcare education and is based on a hospital site, namely St George’s Hospital, which is where the Channel 4 television series 24 hours in A&E is filmed. We offer a unique opportunity to study and work alongside the full range of clinical professionals and their patients. Based in the thriving multi-cultural hub of Tooting in South West London, our location has the added advantage of being just a short tube ride from Central London and all the city lifestyle has to offer.

We also have a range of specialist health and academic facilities to support your learning, listed below.

Laboratories

Our science laboratories are fully fitted with equipment for pharmacology, biological, chemistry, biomedical, molecular biology practicals. This includes microscopes, spectrophotometers, DNA amplifiers, organ baths and specialist glassware. We also have audio visual equipment installed, so that microscope images can be projected onto large screens.

Clinical skills facilities

You will learn the clinical skills you would need to take patients through clinical trials. Our clinical skills areas are set up as needed for students to develop clinical skills, such as the measurement of vital signs, phlebotomy and drug administration. We have a simulation suite and resuscitation facility where students can practice what to do if a clinical trial goes wrong or if someone collapses.

Dissection room

The dissection room is where present and future healthcare professionals and scientists in the hospital and University learn or refresh their anatomy knowledge directly from the human body, through access to cadaveric material and models, and plastinated (preserved) specimens.

Library and learning technology

Our modern health sciences library offers a wide range of books, e-books, academic journals and other resources to support you. You will also have access to online resources, such as the Canvas virtual learning environment

and our Hunter discovery service to help you find the information you need. The library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and comprises silent, quiet and group learning areas, as well as four group discussion rooms.

IT facilities

We have five computer suites housing 260 workstations. Three of these suites are accessible 24 hours a day. It’s easy to find a free space with our handy real-time computer locator. We also have 75 self-service laptops available. Free Wi-Fi covers the whole campus, including all accommodation. You can use these resources to access your course materials, discussion boards and feedback through Canvas.

Student support

Whether you are heading off to university straight from school or college, or returning to education as a mature student, we want to ensure your experience is positive from the outset. At St George’s, you’ll be welcomed by a multicultural student and staff body of different ages, ethnicities, nationalities and backgrounds, all with at least one thing in common – an interest in healthcare, science and medicine.

Students frequently tell us they greatly appreciate the diversity of our student and staff body, as well as the patients who access healthcare services in the borough of Tooting. The University attracts a substantial number – over two-thirds – of ‘mature’ students, aged 21 or over when they start; many have family and caring responsibilities.

We offer a full range of academic support and student services across all institutes, departments and faculties, some of which are listed below. We take pride in offering a transformative educational experience underpinned by cooperation and collaboration between staff and students. Our innovative Student-Staff Partnership Grants (SSPGs), for example, provide funding for small projects led jointly by students and staff.

Personal tutor

On arrival, you will be allocated a personal tutor – someone you will see weekly to ask questions and discuss problems with, both academic and personal. The main purpose of a personal tutor is to monitor your progress, pick up and help you resolve any problems, whether academic or welfare related. Even if they don’t have the answer they will point you in the right direction towards the best people to deal with specific problems.

Induction programme

Within your first week at St George’s, you’ll take part in an induction programme to help with your orientation and introduce you to various study skills, including interprofessional learning and use of the Dissecting Room. Additional sessions provide advice and guidance about the Registry, Students’ Union, personal tutor system, safety, occupational health and sexual health awareness.

Academic staff support

You’ll have access to your lecturers, usually by arrangement via email or our CANVAS (our intranet) discussion boards.

Academic link tutor

The Academic Link Tutor provides you with support on placement, acting as your link with the University and monitoring your achievement and assessment.

Mums and dads scheme

‘Mums and dads’ is a buddy scheme organised by the Students’ Union. Every fresher (first year student) has the choice of being assigned a ‘parent’ from the year above in their respective course. The returning student then acts as a ‘go to’ for advice about courses and university life, providing an additional support system during your first year, both academically and socially. They have been in your position and know the struggles of starting university; they also know all of the best pubs, clubs, restaurants, gyms and will help introduce you to your new St George’s family. 

Student Life Centre

Our Student Centre team can help you with almost any aspect of student life: finances, accommodation, exams and assessment, academic procedures, admissions, international queries, careers, disability and wellbeing, even finding your way around – whatever it takes to make you feel at home.

Careers service

Our careers service works to support current students and recent graduates to find and maintain a rewarding and successful career. As well as general workshops on topics such as writing a CV and developing interview skills, the service works with careers tutors from each course area to ensure there are careers activities specific to your programmes and future profession. You will also be able to book a one-to-one appointment with a careers consultant to discuss all aspects of careers and employability. This might include investigating options and making career decisions, gaining advice and guidance on where to look for jobs, CV and application checking, or booking in for a practice interview.  

Apply for this course through UCAS (the University and College Admissions Service) by 15 January in the year of entry. There are no upper age limits, so we welcome applications from mature students.

How to apply

Application checklist

You must provide the following.

  • Full details of your Level 2 (GCSE or equivalent) qualifications with grades.

  • Full details of your Level 3 (A Level or equivalent) qualifications with achieved/predicted grades.

  • A personal statement (more information about this document is available on the UCAS website). We recommend that you include in your statement a recognition that studying for a BSc in Physiotherapy will include practice and study in a number of settings.

  • An academic reference from your current or most recent institutions with predicted grades.

After submitting your application to UCAS:

  • log in to UCAS Track and make sure all your academic details have been included

  • if any subjects or predicted results are missing, email the Admissions Officer with your UCAS number and missing subjects and grades.

Deferred entry

We will consider applications from applicants who wish to defer entry by a year, provided you plan to use the time constructively. If you are offered a place on the course and subsequently decide to defer, you must inform us by 1 June of the year of application.

After application

We will send you an acknowledgement email and letter when we receive your application. Please make sure your email account is able to accept communications from St George’s as we will mainly communicate with you via email. Selected applicants will be invited to attend interview. Decisions from St George’s will be entered onto UCAS Track and direct applicants will be contacted via email.

We have been working hard to find ways to teach our courses without disruption, while keeping our staff and students safe and making sure we follow government guidance on Covid-19. We won’t be making any significant changes to the content of our programmes, but there will be some changes to the way they are delivered. Please see below for further details of how this may affect this course. 

If government advice changes, we may need to update our plans. If we do so, we will update this information, and will keep current students and offer holders informed by email. 

We will also continue to update our frequently asked question page for applicants and offer holders and current students as more information becomes available. 

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Location of study

Incoming students (starting September 2021)

All face-to-face teaching will take place at St George’s, University of London, on the campus that we share with St George’s Hospital in Tooting, with appropriate social distancing measures in place.

We have not explored alternative locations for teaching and have no immediate plans to do so.

If government advice on social distancing changes, we will consider ways in which we can deliver teaching on site in a manner that is safe for students and staff.

Current students

All face-to-face teaching will take place at St George’s, University of London, on the campus that we share with St George’s Hospital in Tooting, with appropriate social distancing measures in place.

We have not explored alternative locations for teaching and have no immediate plans to do so.

If government advice on social distancing changes, we will consider ways in which we can deliver teaching on site in a manner that is safe for students and staff.

For the Year 2 industrial placements, providers will undertake an appropriate risk assessment and you will be allocated a position depending upon a combination of personal circumstances and career aspirations.

Course content

Years 1 and 2 will operate the same as in the previous academic year, with appropriate changes due to social distancing or online delivery in line with the present guidance.

The number of modules has not changed, but content has been modified as a standard part of curriculum development for a new course.

Everything itemised in the course webpage and documents for Years 1, 2 and 3 will be implemented as planned unless another wave of Covid-19 sparks further government changes to university operations.

How the course is being delivered

Incoming students (September 2021)

The existing learning outcomes for our modules and courses will remain in place.

From September to December 2021 all students will primarily access their learning, including learning materials, via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Canvas.

Hands-on practical teaching and learning activities will be delivered on campus with appropriate social distancing and personal protective equipment (PPE) measures put in place, and with controls on the number of people in each location.

Small-group tutorials will also be held on campus.

The online components of the course will be designed to balance interactive real-time sessions with lecturers and other students, with self-paced independent study.

Students will have clear learning pathways through the activities they are expected to engage with, and there will be opportunities to check learning and progress.

Personal tutor support and all other student support, such as the Academic Success Centre, will also be online for this period, using a range of methods for staying in touch, such as telephone, email and the University’s web conferencing systems BigBlueButton and MSTeams.

Placements are currently expected to take place with minimum changes to planned delivery or timings. All students on placement will be expected to undertake a risk assessment and adhere to local Trust working patterns and guidance.  

To get the most from online study, hardware requirements have been established and communicated to all existing students and offer holders.

Students will need their own personal computer or laptop and an internet connection in their place of accommodation. This needs to be in place at the start of the course.

Once enrolled, students will have the ability to use Office 365 as part of our institutional licence, and access software required for their modules/courses via AppsAnywhere. In addition, we offer Office for Mac via Ofice365, but only the following applications are available for Mac: Teams, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, OneNote. Web-based Office applications are available on Mac. Full details are available here.

There is a provision for students who may struggle to meet the hardware requirements to contact our IT Hardship team.

The Clinical Pharmacology degree will use a hybrid delivery system involving both remote and face-to-face teaching.

Following student consultation and the wish for a balance between onsite and remote teaching, the expectation is that students will be on site for two days a week – primarily, though not exclusively, for small group teaching, practicals and some workshops.

Lectures and workshops will be delivered online as pre-recorded sessions. In addition, you will come to the campus to take part in small group sessions, laboratory practicals and clinical skills sessions. These will be operated with appropriate social distancing measures in line with government recommendations.

The Year 1 sessions at St George’s will run on Mondays and Fridays throughout the semester; occasionally it may be other days. We intend to hold a lab practical in the morning and clinical skills in the afternoon, to minimise your need to use public transport.

You will also take part in a presentation skills workshop run by an external facilitator on campus.

We have designed this blend of online learning that can be done at your leisure, live small group sessions done onsite and physical attendance at St George’s, plus student discussion boards and Q&A, to optimise your experience in these strained times.

Current students

The existing learning outcomes for our modules and courses will remain in place.

From September to December 2021 all students will primarily access their learning, including learning materials, via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Canvas.

Hands-on practical teaching and learning activities will be delivered on campus with appropriate social distancing and personal protective equipment (PPE) measures put in place, and with controls on the number of people in each location.

The online components of the course will be designed to balance interactive real-time sessions with lecturers and other students, with self-paced independent study. Students will have clear learning pathways through the activities they are expected to engage with, and there will be opportunities to check learning and progress.

Personal tutor support and all other student support, such as the Academic Success Centre, will also be online for this period, using a range of methods for staying in touch, such as telephone, email and the University’s web conferencing systems BigBlueButton and MSTeams.

Placements are currently expected to resume from September 2021 with minimum changes to planned delivery or timings. All students on placement will be expected to undertake a risk assessment and adhere to local Trust working patterns and guidance.  

To get the most from online study, hardware requirements have been established and communicated to all existing students and offer holders. Students will need their own personal computer or laptop and an internet connection in their place of accommodation. This needs to be in place at the start of the course.

Once enrolled, students will have the ability to use Office 365 as part of our institutional licence, and access software required for their modules/courses via AppsAnywhere.

In addition, we offer Office for Mac via Ofice365, but only the following applications are available for Mac: Teams, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook, OneNote. Web-based Office applications are available on Mac. Full details are available here.

There is a provision for students who may struggle to meet the hardware requirements to contact our IT Hardship team.

You will have become used to online delivery of lectures, workshops and small groups in your first year.

For year 2 some of the online activities you experienced in year 1 will continue, but you will come on to the campus for small groups, practicals and clinical skills sessions. These will be organised with appropriate social distancing and hand-washing measures.

In the semester 4 you will do a research project for six weeks, followed by industrial experience. Covid-19 considerations are built into these activities.

Exams will be developed as open-book questions, and you will be given plenty of formative experience throughout the first semester of year 2.

For year 3 some of the online activities you experienced in year 2 will continue, but you will come onto the campus for small groups, practicals and some workshops. These will be organised with appropriate social distancing and hand-washing measures and with Covid-19 considerations built into these activities.

Course length

Incoming students (starting September 2021)

We are expecting to deliver the course within the planned timescales, and for students to progress and graduate without delay.

Although some assessments are designed to be taken on site, we have developed an alternative strategy allowing assessments to be completed remotely without coming on to campus.

However, this programme does include practical elements that are delivered in laboratories, clinical cubicles and in our Dissection Room. These will run as planned in 2021/2 with appropriate social distancing measures in place. It may be the case (to be confirmed) Dissecting Room sessions will be on-line and/or simulated.

There is a possibility that government advice on social distancing may change. If that is the case, we will endeavour to delay practical components of the programme to a subsequent semester (or year) to protect the safety of our students.

Current students

We are planning to deliver the course within the planned timescales, and for students to progress and graduate without delay.

Although some assessments are designed to be taken on site, we have developed an alternative strategy allowing assessments to be completed remotely without coming on to campus.

However, this programme does include a year 2 research project, which may be delivered in laboratories. This will run as planned in 2021/2 with appropriate social distancing measures in place.

Our capacity to do so may change if government guidelines change. However, we will strive to ensure that alternative arrangements are in place to enable you to complete on schedule, including the use of previously acquired data from supervisors or data banks.

We are currently intending to put all year 2 students into a workplace experience for five weeks in May 2022. This will occur only if the company completes a risk assessment and can assure effective social distancing.

Our ability to obtain placements may be affected by Covid-19 and we have contingency plans involving seminars from different company employees to provide industrial experience.

We do not intend to delay placements if we can avoid it, as this could impact on students’ ability to complete the course and graduate on schedule.

Assessments

Incoming students (starting September 2021)

We assess the knowledge, skills and attributes of our students in a variety of ways.

One method that was deemed very successful by the previous cohort is a weekly quiz on the past week’s learning material, held in a small group session with your personal tutor and about eight other students. These cover all 6 modules and provide the majority of the in-course assessment.

There will also be other forms of in course assessment that will assess your ability to handle numbers and apply statistical analysis. The course involves a lot of peer review (students rating their colleagues), and this makes your development and progress more manageable.

At the end of the Christmas and Easter terms there is a larger quiz in the same format as the weekly ones. This reinforces your understanding and builds confidence.

All formal written examinations take place in June. At this stage, we expect to deliver these assessments as planned. Although some assessments are designed to be taken on site, St George’s successfully developed an alternative assessment strategy in 2019/20 and 2020/1 to enable students to complete assessments remotely and without coming on to campus.

Regardless of the assessment format, all students will receive considerable practice at exam questions so they feel comfortable undertaking these assignments.

Current students

You will already be used to the weekly quizzes and end of term ‘big quizzes’. These will continue throughout the first semester of year 2.

At the end of the semester, you will sit exam papers either on-site or via online methods. As the exam format will be new to you, you will receive plenty of formative exercises to get familiar with the question type and how to answer exam questions effectively.

In the second semester of year 2, you will do a research project that will assessed by writing a project outline and a short research paper. Neither will be affected by the adaptions to Covid-19. The final assessment will be an oral PowerPoint presentation. Currently, we expect this to be delivered on site. If there is a second Covid-19 wave and government advice changes, we will use appropriate online methods.

Year 3 students will undertake core courses in semester 5, assessed by a written Research Project and examination. Semester 6 will comprise of optional courses which are assessed by In-course assessment (including quizzes) and examination.

Placements and essential hands-on teaching

It is the intention that all placements will be facilitated (including lab-based projects).

Contingency arrangements in case of need would include on-line placements and projects.

Additional costs

We do not expect students to incur any extra costs over and above those that we have advertised on the course page. 

As a result of our courses beginning with the majority of teaching online, you will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online lectures. Information is available on recommended device specification.

If you are worried you might struggle to meet these requirements, please email IThardship@sgul.ac.uk so we can look at support options for you. 

Personal protective equipment (PPE) will be provided for you if needed. 

Course timetable

Year 1 will include 2 sets of on-site small group tutorials (‘Hubs’ and Drugs Based Learnings) plus lectures and workshops. Laboratory and clinical practicals will also be held. Approximately 2 days per week will be on site, Monday and Friday, subject to confirmation.

Year 2, semester 3 will continue to include weekly (or fortnightly) small group tutorials plus lectures and workshops. Laboratory and clinical practicals will also be held. Approximately 2 days per week will be on site, Tuesday and Friday, subject to confirmation. Semester 4 will comprise a practical research project and a work placement block.

Year 3, semester 5 will continue to include fortnightly small group tutorials and regular quizzes. There will also be a written research project. Semester 6 will comprise of optional modules. Approximately two-three days per week will be on-site.

Course timetables are normally available a month before the start of the semester. Please note that while we make every effort to ensure that timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week (Monday–Friday). Wednesday afternoons are normally reserved for sports and cultural activities.  

Term dates

Consenting to these changes

At enrolment or re-enrolment you consented to the changes we anticipated as a result of the pandemic, which were outlined on the ‘Covid-19 updates’ tab of your course page

The changes that we are making are the consequence of current public health advice and our need to anticipate changes to that advice. Our capacity to offer alternatives is therefore limited. We do not feel that the changes will adversely affect students.  

If you wish to avoid these changes (e.g. by taking a year out from your studies) please discuss this directly with your course team in the first instance.

We remain, as always, focused on the best experience and outcomes for our students.  

Making a complaint

If you have concerns about the quality of course delivery, please raise these with your course team in the first instance. 

If you wish to take a more formal route, guidance is available to you in our student concerns and complaints procedure.

“I have found online studying to be quite successful for me. You can interact with your peers and lecturers as you usually would, but all from the comfort of your home. ”

- Jennifer, Medicine (MBBS) student, 4th year

Apply now

Duration

Three years, full time

Application Deadline

Applications are still being accepted through UCAS

UCAS Code

B210, institution code S49

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