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Duration

One year full-time, two years part-time

Application Deadline

30 June 2020

Location

St George's, University of London

UK, EU and non-EU (international) citizens may apply

Start dates

September 2020

Although mental health is now increasingly more understood as a topic, addressing mental health has been a neglected and overlooked aspect of healthcare. In many societies around the globe, experiences related to the mind are not conceptualised as a health issue. Developing mental health infrastructure as part of global health systems is a contemporary encounter with important conceptual and ethical questions. At the same time, increased globalisation is bringing forth travelling cultures and traditional understandings about mental illness. Orthodox healthcare practitioners and policy-makers are responding to phenomena such as spirit possession, accusations of child witchcraft, curses, and forced exorcisms. Exploring culture and mental health questions fundamental aspects of our existence such as our identity, customs, and symbolisms against the backdrop of a human rights discourse and the need to address treatment gaps in global mental health.

Global health is a broad discipline that attracts multidisciplinary involvement from those who wish to pursue an internationally focused career in development, policy, education, research or humanitarian relief. This will include doctors and other health professionals, as well as a range of people with an interest in governance, management, law, politics, economics, policy, science, anthropology, philosophy and ethics. 

This Global Health MSc is a broad-ranging practical and clinical course that covers many different aspects of global health practice and policy. We have excellent local, regional and international links, enabling our students to complete global health projects in many different locations around the world. The university also shares its campus with one of the largest NHS teaching hospitals and many world-leading clinicians teach on our courses. 

This stimulating and vibrant programme will give you the skills and knowledge necessary to understand, interpret and help solve critical global health challenges, empowering you to pursue an exciting international career as a global health practitioner or policymaker. The programme will also give you the ability to make a real difference in the pursuit of health equity and global social justice.

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Highlights

  • The flexible structure of the MSc Global Health suite allows you to select a specialism of your choice.

  • Excellent academic connections for potential placements in London and overseas.

  • Students from a range of backgrounds creates a diverse learning community where knowledge is shared across disciplines.

  • Enjoy working with other students, researchers and clinicians as part of a small, close-knit team, with all the advantages that brings for personal networking and development.

Tuition fees

2020 UK/EU
  • Full-time MSc: £11,000

  • Part-time MSc: £5,500 per annum

2020 Non-EU (International)
  • Full-time MSc: £21,500

  • Part-time MSc: £11,250 per annum

Fees are reviewed annually.

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

Funding your study

We have a range of funding opportunities available for students. You may be eligible for the following.

  • A postgraduate loan from the UK government of up to £10,609. Find out more information about postgraduate loans at fees and funding.

  • An alumni discount – if you're a former St George’s student you can qualify for an additional 10% discount from this course.

For more information, see our fees and funding pages.

Read more information about our courses and university services terms and conditions.

To be considered for this course, you will need to:

  • meet the entry criteria

  • write a personal statement

  • provide two suitable references.

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Undergraduate degree or equivalent

You should have or be expected to achieve, a minimum of a second class degree (2:2). For healthcare graduates, a pass is required. All degrees must be awarded before 1st August on the year of entry.

We welcome applications from individuals from a range of backgrounds, including humanities, science and healthcare. 

Alternative professional qualifications, or previous related experience, may be considered and we encourage you to apply. You will be expected to have experience of working in global health (eg for non-governmental organisations) and you may be required to submit supplementary details (eg transcripts).

International qualifications

We accept equivalent qualifications gained in other countries and use to UKNARIC assess. Please see our International Student Support pages for more information. If you have any questions, you can contact us at study@sgul.ac.uk.

English language requirements

For details on English Language requirements, please see here. This is a Group 1 course.

Personal statement and references

You will be asked to outline your reasons for applying for the course in a brief personal statement on the application form. You will also need to provide two satisfactory references. See the ‘Apply’ tab for more information.

When you graduate with a Global Health MSc from St George’s, you’ll open your world to a range of opportunities.

The breadth of experience that you will gain on the course will place you in prime position to make impactful change relating to your area of interest. You will have the skills to go on to work as a global health practitioner, policy maker, consultant or researcher in either government or the private sector, as well as national and international agencies.

Teaching is delivered through a variety of methods including group lectures, course-specific seminars and small group sessions. You will also participate in self-directed study and wider reading, as well as individual and group practical sessions.

The course is designed to encourage you to progress towards greater self-direction in your studies; you are encouraged to develop insight into your own learning styles and thus to become responsible for your own learning and professional development. Personal and professional development is fostered through academic study, the promotion of self-directed learning activities, and the implementation of a research project under supervision.

You will encounter a wide range of teaching and learning strategies appropriate to the learning context. Combining these strategies during the course will enable you to develop an investigative, independent and individualised approach to learning and to undertake an extended research project.

There is a wide variety of optional modules and also a broad and exciting range of research projects including humanities projects, laboratory projects and clinical projects. Research projects will be offered in London and internationally.  This diversity is common across our whole MSc Global Health suite of programmes.

By designing the programme as a series of related but independent modules, we can deliver a highly flexible programme. You have the option a full MSc over one year full-time or two years part-time. Each module can also be studied independently as Continued Professional Development (CPD).

At St George’s, you’ll benefit from working as part of a small, close-knit team. Students, clinicians and researchers work happily and effectively together in a small community, with all the advantages that brings for personal input and development.

On the Global Health and Mental Health MSc you have a wide choice of options, allowing you to tailor your programme while focusing on the international mental health discourse.

The full MSc comprises 180 credits.

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Core modules

Global Governance for Health (15 credits)

In this module you will explore the roles and responsibilities of national and international organisations in improving the health of populations. You will learn about the role of donors and the effect of donor strategies on health at a global and national level. You will also analyse how international organisations, national governments and non-governmental organisations attempt to reduce the global burden of disease. This module will give you a richer understanding of the global health challenges that face healthcare professionals, politicians and policy makers in the 21st century, and the importance of good governance in achieving health equity. 

Culture and Mental Health (15 credits)

In this module you will learn how mental health can be improved worldwide using different cultural frameworks of mental illness. You will analyse the global development of a mental health framework from an ethical, transcultural, and human rights perspective. As part of this analysis, you will explore the theories and principles of humanitarianism. You will discuss the issues of stigma and the medicalisation of mental disorders, using case scenarios and examples of localised cultural practices in the interpretation and management of mental health. 

MSc research project (60 credits)

This module gives you the opportunity to conduct an independent project related to your area of interest. It covers preparation and planning for the research as well as the analysis, discussion and presentation of the outcomes. You will be supervised by an experienced academic based at St George’s and, if you complete your research project abroad, you will also receive local support. 

If you are intending to take an MSc Global Health themed award, the research project must be on a topic related to that theme. 

Optional modules

Antimicrobial Resistance (30 credits)

This module will give you the opportunity to study antimicrobial resistance (AMR), with a particular focus on healthcare impact, genetic technologies and interventions to reduce AMR. You will explore the major AMR problems and the strategies needed to reduce the current and future AMR burden. You will gain insight into how different interventions may be more effective in reducing different AMR pathogens and will take advantage of active research at St George’s to work on specific topics including AMR in TB, MRSA and HIV.

To study this module you should normally have, or be expected to achieve, a minimum of a second class degree (2:2) in a biomedical science or a science related subject (or an equivalent overseas qualification).

Conflict and Catastrophe Medicine (30 credits)

This module will give you a thorough grounding in providing medical care in a range of hostile and challenging environments, whether man-made or natural disasters. Previous natural disasters and conflicts provide case studies through which to explore the challenges experienced in and diverse skills required for humanitarian work, and guide learning of good management practice. These case studies will shine a light on some of the debates and issues surrounding humanitarian work and disaster relief. You will gain an understanding of the depth and breadth of the subject, and the importance of the external factors which impact medical care. You will also explore the important roles of other professionals in the field such as engineers and logisticians.

Global Health Diseases (30 credits)

This module deals with a wide range of clinical aspects of the major current and emerging clinical conditions affecting populations across the world. You will learn about communicable diseases, such as HIV, malaria and TB, and emerging non-communicable epidemics such as obesity, diabetes and cancer. Each condition is examined from a global perspective, and you will explore the aetiology, pathology, clinical manifestations, prevention approaches and schemes of clinical management of each disease. Through case studies you will also explore the importance of epidemiology, surveillance, data gathering and public health initiatives in tackling specific diseases. 

Global Health Ethics and Law (30 credits)

This module provides an opportunity for you to consider global health from an ethico-legal perspective. You will learn about cosmopolitanism, nationalism, distributive justice, consequentialism, deontology and human rights theory. You will then use a variety of theoretical normative approaches to analyse a range of global health challenges. You will also learn about the emergence of global health law and the way in which international law impacts on a range of global health issues. By completing the module, you will gain a richer understanding of the global health challenges that face healthcare professionals, politicians and policy makers and you will develop a deeper understanding of the relevance of ethics and law to the overarching aim of improving health for all. 

Infection and Immunity (30 credits)

This module will cover the broad area of the immunology of infectious disease, taking advantage of active research taking place at St George’s by exploring some of the specific causes of infection such as tuberculosis, malaria, MRSA and viral infections such as HIV.  You will learn about the cellular and molecular responses to infection including innate and adaptive immune responses, and how these responses can sometimes be deleterious. The module will provide insight into the pathogenesis of infection and the virulence mechanisms involved. It will also demonstrate how these processes drives vaccine development, antibiotic treatment and immunotherapy.

To study this module you should normally have, or be expected to achieve, a minimum of a second class degree (2:2) in a biomedical science or a science related subject (or an equivalent overseas qualification).

Humanitarian Action and Ethics (15 credits)

Humanitarian action must now respond to increasingly complex crises. Challenges faced by humanitarian workers are impacted by the changing nature of conflict, climate change and disasters in a globalised world. In addition, humanitarian organisations are under pressure in terms of their values and roles in volatile political situations, especially when they are structured by extreme religious ideology.

The effects of humanitarian crises are increasingly globalised, as seen with recent trends in migration and forced displacement. Humanitarian action is a cross-cultural endeavour and due to advancements in medical technologies, medical dilemmas are further fraught with ethical challenges. Human rights frameworks exist against the backdrop of health injustice and vulnerable populations and demands that humanitarian actors undertake roles in truth, peace, reconciliation and justice efforts.

This module on Humanitarian Health Ethics exposes some of the most pressing questions about the fragility of the human condition; responding to human distress in extreme situations means that decisions are not always ideal. Ethical dilemmas faced by humanitarian health actors will be critically analysed drawing on case scenarios and drawing on examples of their moral experience of the field.

Global Health and Comparative Health Systems (15 credits)

In this module you will focus on the fundamental principles of health system organisation and financing, considering a number of conceptual frameworks for the analysis of health systems in both the global north and south. You will explore issues concerning health system service models and design. Amongst these you will explore relevant issues including the relationship between supply and demand, models of healthcare resource allocation, and methods to measure and compare health system performance.

Global Health Humanities (15 credits)

In this module you will examine different aspects of the humanities in global health: narrative-based medicine; the role of the humanities in medical education; cross-cultural concepts of health and illness; exiled writers and health activism; therapeutic aspects of health humanities; cultural competency; global narratives; and story-telling for trauma. You will reflect on and consider topics that you personally perceive as being crucial for global health and the role of narrative in bringing health injustice and human rights abuses to light for various organisations. You will also learn about the role of narrative in promoting health particularly in societies facing conflict, oppression and lack of health care resources.

Research support modules

You may choose one of the following modules to help you prepare for your research project.

Practical Data Analysis: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches (15 credits)

This module runs alongside the Statistics module and the Research Methods module. It will help you to apply in practice the qualitative and quantitative methodologies that are taught in these lectures. You will develop skills in understanding, critically interpreting and extracting data, and will be supported in the application of appropriate qualitative and quantitative data analysis methodologies. 

Research Methods (15 credits)

This module introduces you to a range of research approaches and appropriate methods relevant to your degree course. It covers methods appropriate to research undertaken in areas from biomedical science to health services research.

Statistics (15 credits)

This module introduces you to modern statistical techniques and methods. In particular, you will be encouraged to critically appraise the statistical methods used in research papers, and to develop the skills needed to interpret the results of the analyses presented and evaluate the inferences made.

You will develop your understanding of statistical techniques and methods, so that you can analyse quantitative data and make inferences from the results when undertaking your research project. This module is delivered by lectures and group discussions, supplemented by self-directed learning.

Before beginning your application please check the entry criteria of the course you wish to study to ensure you meet the required standards.

All applications must be submitted through our online application system.

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How to apply

  1. Click on the relevant application link above.

  2. Create an account.

  3. Complete the application form and upload any relevant documents. You can save a partly completed form and return to it later. Please make sure you complete all sections. Please make sure that the information you provide is accurate, including the options you select in menus.

  4. Add pgadmissions@sgul.ac.uk to your address book to ensure you do not miss any important emails from us.

  5. When you have checked that your application is complete and accurate, click ‘Submit’.

You can track your application online.

References

When completing your application, you will be asked to provide contact details of two referees. Please ensure these details are accurate. As soon as you have submitted your application, your referees will be contacted by the university asking them to upload a reference to your online application.

One must be a recent academic reference. The other should be either a second academic reference or a professional/employer reference. They should cover your suitability for the course and your academic ability.

Your referees should know you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. We do not accept references from family, friends, partners, ex-partners or yourself.

We will send reminder emails to your referees but it is your responsibility to ensure that contact details are correct and referees are available to submit a reference. References should be uploaded within two weeks of making your application.

Apply now

Duration

One year full-time, two years part-time

Application Deadline

30 June 2020

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