Eating breakfast daily may help to prevent early development of diabetes risk in children

Children who eat breakfast daily have a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than those who skip it or only eat it occasionally, says new research.

They also found that among children eating breakfast, those who eat a high-fibre breakfast cereal also have lower type 2 diabetes risk profiles, indicated by blood samples revealing insulin resistance, compared to children who eat a breakfast with a lower fibre content.

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Loss of sensation in the feet of diabetes patients linked to cardiovascular disease, say researchers

Experts have discovered that loss of sensation in the feet, a result of diabetes, may be a predictor of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and strokes.

Diabetes, which affects 3.7million people in the UK, can cause damage to a person’s blood vessels and nerves, especially if their blood sugar is poorly controlled, leading to poor circulation and loss of sensation in the feet, known as peripheral neuropathy.

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New research finds a way to predict which HIV patients will respond better to future therapeutic vaccine

A new study suggests that HIV patients with a higher level of a particular biomarker, or a measurable indicator found in the blood, may respond more favourably to an experimentalimmune activating vaccine.

Experts at St George’s, University of London, and Norwegian vaccine company, Bionor Pharma Researchers, believe the findings might lead to a more customised vaccine for certain patients, which potentially might permit them to come off antiretrovirals, drugs used to treat HIV.

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Experts to combat the potential ‘health catastrophe’ of deadly tuberculosis among people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate the benefits of different ways to carry out screening both patients with tuberculosis (TB) for diabetes and the other way around in parts of the world where both diseases are common.

Those who live in urban areas and on low incomes in less well-off countries are especially at risk of developing TB.

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Smoking at trendy hubble-bubble cafes may increase risk of heart disease, say experts

People who smoke shisha regularly could be increasing the threat of heart disease, according to new research.

Shisha smoking, which is also called hookah or hubble-bubble smoking, is a way of smoking tobacco which is sometimes mixed with flavouring, through a bowl using a hose or tube which has become fashionable in Middle Eastern-style cafes.

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