Is hygiene really healthy? - Spotlight on Science free public event

Allergic diseases like asthma and hay fever are on the rise.  Scientists at St George’s, University of London are at the forefront of understanding why this might be. Come and learn about how modern lifestyles and our growing quest for hygiene contribute to allergies.

Date/Time:         Tuesday 3rd March - 6pm

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Previous events: Community Open Day 2014

The St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and St George's, University of London annual Community Open Day took place on Saturday 15 November from 10.30am to 4pm.

Filled with fun, interactive activities for children and adults alike, the event was an enjoyable and informative day for the whole family.

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Spotlight on Science: Living with Type 1 Diabetes

St George's, University of London is home to world leaders in diabetes research and we invited the public in to meet them on Monday 20 October 2014 as part of our Spotlight on Science series aimed at illuminating research that affects our everyday lives.

Our researchers were joined by people who have dealt with Type 1 Diabetes all of their lives and understand the struggle patients experience. Guests were given tips and tricks on how to stay active and healthy as well as the opportunity to get an insight into new treatment developments for Type 1 Diabetes.

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The Art of Medicine: The Empathy Exams

We had a full house as New York Times acclaimed author Leslie Jamison visited St George's, University of London to discuss her new book and work as an actor teaching medical students empathy.

Leslie visited St George's on the back of a tour of her new book The Empathy Exams, which has received high praise both in the US and the UK. The book has been described as "A heady and unsparing examination of pain and how it allows us to understand others, and ourselves" and Leslie demonstrated her shrewd critical perspective as she discussed the importance of engendering empathy in future healthcare professionals.

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Spotlight on Science: Resisting the Antibiotic Apocalypse

On Thursday 3 July 2014 we imagined a world without antibiotics, where basic operations and common infections become a major threat to humanity and welcomed the public in to find out more about our antibiotic research.

Wendy Lawson, of the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Antibiotic Action, was one of the speakers and she described the current state of antibiotics.Academics from St George's, Professor Jodi Lindsay and Dr Tim Planche and Professor Philip Butcher also gave their expert opinions.Prof Lindsay discussed the future of the bacterial infection while Professor Philip Butcher spoke about tuberculosis (TB) and how London now has the highest level of TB infections in Europe.Dr Tim Planche gave a valuable insight from a clinician's perspective on the waning effectiveness of antibiotics.The Infection Control team from St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust joined the event and demonstrated proper hand-washing techniques to attendees, who also got the opportunity to chat with our researchers and use some of the equipment from our labs.

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The Art of Medicine: Eternal Art of the Simulated Mind

Our series 'The Art of Medicine' continued on Wednesday 16 April at 6pm with 'Eternal Art of the Simulated Mind'. Artist Alban Low and senior lecturer Harvey Wells of St George's, University of London and Kingston University presented their exciting new art exhibition and award-winning short films, working with health students and patients.

The work is based on mental health nursing students and their clinical simulations as part of their St George's, University of London and Kingston University training. The work presents fascinating insight into how art and healthcare can work together to help patients and professionals. This was a free public event, open to all and part of our series that aims to highlight how art, the humanities, science and medicine work together and emphasise the importance of varied perspectives for healthcare professionals.To find out more about the artist and view the films showcased please visit albanlow.co.uk

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Spotlight on Science: Preventing Sudden Death in Sport

Former England rugby player Lee Mears lent his support to a successful event examining the issue of sudden death in sport.

Cardiac specialist Professor Sanjay Sharma gave a talk explaining the work that cardiologists are doing to prevent sudden death in sport. He spoke on the issues facing athletes and practitioners and showed striking footage of how treatment can be used to save lives.Lee, who retired in 2013 after being diagnosed with a heart condition, spoke about his own experiences of dealing with his diagnosis and working with Sanjay to aid his recovery. He had an out-standing career in professional rugby, with 201 caps for club Bath, 42 for England and four for the British and Irish Lions.They were joined by Dr Steve Cox, deputy chief executive and director of screening at the charity Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY), who spoke about the screening for heart problems. He also gave practical advice to those concerned about the issue. Former professional footballer Tobi Alabi was also in attendance and was happy to speak about his own experience with heart issues and sign autographs for Millwall fans.

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The Art of Medicine: Self-portrait without breasts

On Monday 25 November 2013 St George's, University of London was proud to launch a new 'The Art of Medicine' series which aims to draw out the myriad connections between medicine, science and the arts.

'The Art of Medicine: Self-Portrait without Breasts’ presented poet Clare Best’s personal journey through preventive double mastectomy, supported by clinical oncologist Dr James Mackay from University College London.

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The St George's, University of London Human Library

As part of the St George's Healthcare Trust and St George's, University of London Community Open Day, members of the public were given a chance to chat with some of our world-renowned experts who posed as 'books'.

A team of researchers, consultants, lecturers and students played the role of 'books' and discussed various aspects of their work and life at St George's, University of London.

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Spotlight on Science: World Rabies Day 2013

We welcomed the public to our third Spotlight on Science event, 'World Rabies Day', providing an insight into our ground-breaking rabies research.

Speakers at the event included; Julian Ma, professor of molecular immunology at St George’s University; Dr Waranyoo Phoolcharoen; Dr Ashley Banyard, research scientist at Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) researchers from the University of Cambridge and Dr Phuchphob Mongkolnavin of the Thai embassy. Dr Phuchphob spoke about his experience of fighting the rabies epidemic in Thailand.

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Spotlight on Science: World Malaria Day 2013

World Malaria Day 2013 at St George’s aimed to give local people, including schoolchildren, the chance to learn about the battle against malaria being waged in the heart of their community.

The event was the first in the St George's, University of London 'Spotlight on science' series, a programme that demonstrates to the public how St George’s scientists are tackling major scientific issues.

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