New survey launched into serious infection in babies

Researchers have launched a national study to see how common the potentially fatal bacterial infection Group B streptococcus is in UK and Irish babies.

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a bacterium that can cause serious infections. It is the most important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and of meningitis in the first three months of life.

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New study shows that pre-participation screening guidelines are too restrictive and unfair for black athletes

A new study by researchers at St George’s, University of London published in the journal Circulation has found that current European screening guidelines used by sports organisations to detect heart abnormalities lead to over-investigation and potential false disqualification of black athletes with perfectly healthy hearts. 

To protect the health of young sports people, many sports bodies now recommend or insist that athletes are screened for a number of heart disorders that can lead to sudden death but are easily detectable using an electrocardiogram (ECG) - a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart and detects abnormal heart rhythms. New research has found that the application of new screening criteria could reduce unnecessary investigations and potential disqualifications by around 30%.

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New study shows guidelines are preventing organ donations that could save dozens of tiny lives in UK

Dozens of tiny lives could be saved if medical guidance about the death of new born babies was changed to allow the donation of organs, a new study has found.

The research paper, published in the BMJ journal Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, shows the potential for organ donation among very young babies is currently ‘untapped’ in the UK because of national guidelines about the way clinicians define and diagnose death.

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Study shows new drugs can increase the function of good cholesterol particles but may not be enough to reduce heart attacks

Researchers have found a new class of drugs can improve the ability of particles in the blood which can increase so-called ‘good’ cholesterol’s ability to clear away fat from blood vessel walls.

 

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Study shows new drugs can increase the function of good cholesterol particles but may not be enough to reduce heart attacks

Researchers have found a new class of drugs can improve the ability of particles in the blood which can increase so-called ‘good’ cholesterol’s ability to clear away fat from blood vessel walls.

The reduction of furring up of blood vessels – called atherosclerosis by medical experts - relies on reducing the amount of fat laid down in the vessel wall for example by taking statins or by improving the efficacy of good cholesterol which carries fat deposits away from the blood vessel lining.

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