St George’s in genomes project to fight cancer and rare diseases

Patients in the UK will be the first in the world to participate in an ambitious programme to sequence 100,000 genomes as part of a “paradigm shift” in healthcare focusing on the genetic causes of disease.

The South London-based Genomics Network Alliance has been announced as a successful bidder in the race to become a pioneering Genomic Medicine Centre, as part of the ground-breaking 100,000 Genomes Project.

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Research at St George’s ranked fourth in the UK for global impact

The Research Excellence Framework (REF), a new national assessment of research at UK universities has ranked St George’s, University of London, as fourth for impact of its research on the global community.

The expert panels who carried out the assessment also ranked St George’s joint 42nd in the country overall which is a rise of 24 places from a similar exercise carried out six years ago.

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Drugs used for impotence could treat vascular dementia?

Scientists are to explore whether drugs usually used to treat erectile problems by expanding blood vessels could become the next major way to tackle the dementia epidemic.

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Cheap malaria drug could treat colorectal cancer effectively too, say experts

Medical experts say a common malaria drug could have a significant impact on colorectal cancer providing a cheap adjunct to current expensive chemotherapy.

A pilot study by researchers at St George’s, University of London, has found the drug artesunate, which is a widely used anti-malaria medicine, had a promising effect on reducing the multiplication of tumour cells in colorectal cancer patients who were already going to have their cancer surgically removed.

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Cannabis extract can have dramatic effect on brain cancer, says new research

Experts have shown that when certain parts of cannabis are used to treat cancer tumours alongside radiotherapy treatment the growths can virtually disappear

The new research by specialists at St George’s, University of London, studied the treatment of brain cancer tumours in the laboratory and discovered that the most effective treatment was to combine active chemical components of the cannabis plant which are called cannabinoids.

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