The St George’s Four: Meet the women that shaped St George’s

As part of our international women’s day campaign, we visited the archives to delve through the rich history of George’s. Here we discovered the hidden stories of the first women to study at St George’s or, as they were commonly known at the time, the George’s Four.

 Hetty Claremont, Mariam Bostock, Helen Ingleby and Elizabeth O’Flynn were the first women to study at what was then St George’s medical school, admitted to study for three months at St George’s for clinical skills training in 1915, which, at the time, was an extremely controversial decision, but due to the depleted numbers of male students and doctors the board decide to allow the women to enrol.

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"We, as healthcare professionals of all hues, must be aware of our potential to be advocates to ensure the voice and needs of women are heard"

On International Women’s Day, Professor Jenny Higham, Principal of St George’s, University of London shares her thoughts about threats to women’s health and wellbeing worldwide and how we can begin to overcome them.   

What are the main threats to women’s health and wellbeing you see worldwide?

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Meet the Researcher: discovering the secrets of osteoarthritis with Professor Nidhi Sofat

Professor Nidhi Sofat is a clinician scientist and Professor of Rheumatology at St George’s. She investigates the mechanisms responsible for pain and reduced function in arthritis and is involved in several clinical studies. She treats patients in her capacity as Consultant Rheumatologist at St George’s Hospital.

 


"I don't think I'd have written these particular stories if I hadn't spent these years studying in Tooting"

International Women’s Day is an annual event which falls on 8 March each year. It has celebrated the achievements of women around the world since 1911. The theme for International Women’s Day 2019 is ‘Balance for Better’ to help forge a more gender-balanced world.

Roopa Farooki is a fourth-year graduate entry medic and published author. She is about to launch a series of children books about black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) women in science.

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Genetic therapies in the spotlight for Rare Disease Day

To mark Rare Disease Day today, scientists from the Genetics Research Centre at St George’s have set up a stand at the university to raise awareness of these conditions and explain more about their work in this area.

Rare diseases are those defined as affecting fewer than 1 in 2000 of the population. One rare disease may affect only a handful of patients, but lack of scientific knowledge about these diseases may often delay diagnosis and access to treatment and care – and in fact, often no effective treatments will have been developed.

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