Famous author to speak at St George's

On Wednesday 23 January Angela Saini, author of Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong, will be in conversation at St George's, University of London.

Angela is a science journalist and broadcaster who regularly presents science programmes on BBC Radio. Her writing has appeared in New Scientist, the Guardian, The Times, and Wired. Angela has a Masters in Engineering from the University of Oxford and was a Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her journalism has received accolades from both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of British Science Writers. Earlier this year, she was named as one of the most influential women in science by BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.Her latest book, Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong, was published in 2017 to widespread critical acclaim, and was named the Physics World Book of the Year.The event in January is a unique opportunity to meet the author of a ground-breaking book, to ask questions, explore ideas and be part of a vital conversation. Event detailsDate: Wednesday 23 January 2019Time: 1-2pmLocation: Michael Heron lecture theatre Spaces are limited. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Everyone is welcome to attend what promises to be an event to get 2019 off to a great start.

Angela Cropped2

Global review finds consumption of children’s antibiotics varies widely from country to country

Researchers carrying out the first global review of the sales of antibiotics for children found that consumption varies widely from country to country with little correlation between countries’ wealth and the types of antibiotics.

Researchers looked at the sales of antibiotics formulated for children in 70 high- and middle-income countries.


Poor diabetes control can lead to increased risk of serious infections, study shows

A new study has shown that diabetes patients with the poorest control of their blood sugars face the highest risks of hospitalisation and death due to infections.

The study, conducted by researchers at St George’s, University of London, analysed the electronic GP and hospital records of more than 85,000 English adults aged 40 to 89 years with a diabetes diagnosis and a measurement of glycated haemoglobin, or long-term blood sugar, which is a marker of diabetes control. The researchers compared diabetes patients with poor control to those with good control, and to people without diabetes.


Research trial aims to reduce major cause of birth disabilities

Researchers are beginning recruitment in a trial to see if changing pregnant women’s hygiene habits could reduce the risks of a major cause of childhood disabilities.

Cytomegalovirus, or CMV, is the most common congenital infection in the UK, affecting around 1000 babies every year. If babies are infected while in the womb it can result in serious health problems, such as cerebral palsy, developmental delay and hearing loss.


A medical applicants’ guide to Clearing and Adjustment

Medicine is one of the most competitive university courses to apply for. At St George’s, University of London alone, we received 10 applications for every place on our undergraduate medical degree last year. So, it’s no surprise that many applicants with the potential to be great doctors don’t get a place straight away. We’ve put together some options for you if you applied to medicine but aren’t holding a place.

Whether you didn’t receive any offers or you’ve received your A Level results and it’s not the news you’d hoped for, you don’t have to give up your ambitions. You have plenty of choices, even if you still have your heart set on a career in medicine.

Students study a flayed leg