Interviews with STI patients provide guidance for point-of care testing

A study of patient opinions and expectations about the potential use of point of care tests (POCTs) has found there is broad support for the introduction of these in sexually transmitted infection clinics, but that patients’ willingness to wait for results can be more complex.

Researchers carried out interviews with clinicians and patients in six sexual health clinics in the UK as part of a programme investigating the design and implementation of instant tests in these settings.

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Working Well When Times Are Hard

Few people navigate their careers without times when work is difficult, often because our professional and personal lives collide, says Professor Deborah Bowman, Deputy Principal (Institutional Affairs) and Professor of Bioethics, Clinical Ethics and Medical Law at St George’s.

Here, she shares her own experiences and explores how the St George’s community is opening up conversations around these issues.

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Tooting 'Science Stars' graduate

On Wednesday 27 March, fourteen GCSE students from Ernest Bevin College in Tooting Bec attended a graduation ceremony from the Science Stars programme at St George’s.

In total, 15 students from the college completed the 20-week programme created by our Widening Participation team in conjunction with St George’s alumnus, and Lecturer in Education at the University of Gloucestershire, Neil Gilbride.

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Researchers win £50,000 Cancer Research UK prize to make cancer antibodies in plants

Two researchers from St George’s have won a national prize for their novel plan to use plant engineering to create antibodies for cancer immunotherapy.

Cancer Research UK’s first Innovation Prizes support early-career researchers in identifying and progressing the commercial potential of their research.

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Study finds young athletes are slightly more likely to have enlarged heart aortas

Athletics training is associated with an increase in the athletes’ heart ventricle wall thickness and cavity size. These changes are facilitated by the growth of heart muscle cells, or myocytes, in response to an increased load on the heart from intensive physical exercise. Following episodes of ‘detraining’, the heart size returns to normal.

Two previous large studies involving athletes have shown that the thoracic aorta is also slightly increased in size; however, the significance of an enlarged aorta is unknown. Given that the aorta consists of a large amount of elastic tissue, it is possible that an enlarged aorta may represent reduced elastic properties and an inherent risk of aortic rupture. Although it might be expected that very tall athletes, such as basketball players, would have a very dilated aorta based on their size, a recent American study showed that the aortic diameter rarely exceeds 40 mm.

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