Researchers discover new genes associated with heart function

A new study from an international research team, led by Dr Yalda Jamshidi at St George’s, University of London, has identified new genes associated with heart function and development. 

An electrocardiogram (ECG), which records a heart's rhythm and electrical activity, can be used to identify life-threatening heart problems which often have a strong genetic basis. The team compared ECGs and the genetic makeup of almost 200,000 individuals to gain insight into the genetics that underlie heart rhythm. This was done using large-scale genetic association studies focusing on protein-coding parts of the genome. They chose to focus on rare variants that are often missed in large scale population studies, for follow-up.


Jon Friedland, infectious diseases expert, to lead research and enterprise

Leading tuberculosis and infectious diseases expert Professor Jon Friedland has been appointed as Deputy Principal (Research and Enterprise) at St George’s, University of London.

25 May 2018


New sensor discovery has implications for brain research

A new reagent discovered by research scientists at St George’s, University of London has shown real-time brain behaviour in more detail than ever before.

16 May 2018

Synapse and neuron cellsNEWS

Study investigates whether pregnant women are willing to go home after an induction

A study conducted by St George’s, University of London is discovering if pregnant women who need inductions will opt to go home after the process has been started in hospital. 

120 women are being recruited across two sites; St George’s Hospital in Tooting, and at the Medway Hospital in Kent. The study randomises low-risk women who have agreed to the process to either a new mechanical method, a trans-cervical balloon catheter; or to a pharmacological method, a Prostaglandin vaginal suppository.

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St George’s strongest in world for research influence

St George’s, University of London, has been ranked the best in the world for the second year running for the quality of citations for research influence in the Times Higher World University Rankings 2018.

5 September 2017

Times Higher ranking logo 250 2017

Institute director gets prestigious Fellowship

Professor Dorothy Bennett, Director of our Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, has been elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

9 May 2017

Prof. Dot Bennett

Experts urge more research to discover how many babies die from antibiotic resistance

No one knows how many newborns are dying each year due to antibiotic resistant infections, because of a lack of funding to research the issue fully, Professor Mike Sharland from St George’s, University London said.

18 May 2016


Heart problems more likely if you grow up in a working class family, says new research

People who grew up in working class families are more likely to suffer heart problems later in life even if their own socioeconomic status changes, says new research.

10 May 2016


Patients with learning disabilities less likely to be diagnosed with cancer

Coronary heart disease and cancer rates among people with learning disabilities are nearly a third lower than the general population, says new research.

12 April 2016


Cheap malaria drug could treat colorectal cancer effectively too, say experts

Medical experts say a common malaria drug could have a significant impact on colorectal cancer providing a cheap adjunct to current expensive chemotherapy.

A pilot study by researchers at St George’s, University of London, has found the drug artesunate, which is a widely used anti-malaria medicine, had a promising effect on reducing the multiplication of tumour cells in colorectal cancer patients who were already going to have their cancer surgically removed.

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Experts at St George’s join crucial Ebola vaccine test on humans

Scientists based at St George’s, University of London, have joined an international consortium to conduct a clinical trial to test an Ebola vaccine in Africa.

The first results are projected to be available just a few weeks after the first vaccination, enabling a decision to be made about whether the vaccine can be introduced into affected West African communities.

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New research finds a way to predict which HIV patients will respond better to future therapeutic vaccine

A new study suggests that HIV patients with a higher level of a particular biomarker, or a measurable indicator found in the blood, may respond more favourably to an experimentalimmune activating vaccine.

Experts at St George’s, University of London, and Norwegian vaccine company, Bionor Pharma Researchers, believe the findings might lead to a more customised vaccine for certain patients, which potentially might permit them to come off antiretrovirals, drugs used to treat HIV.

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New study shows guidelines are preventing organ donations that could save dozens of tiny lives in UK

Dozens of tiny lives could be saved if medical guidance about the death of new born babies was changed to allow the donation of organs, a new study has found.

The research paper, published in the BMJ journal Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, shows the potential for organ donation among very young babies is currently ‘untapped’ in the UK because of national guidelines about the way clinicians define and diagnose death.

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