Poor diabetes control can lead to increased risk of serious infections, study shows

A new study has shown that diabetes patients with the poorest control of their blood sugars face the highest risks of hospitalisation and death due to infections.

The study, conducted by researchers at St George’s, University of London, analysed the electronic GP and hospital records of more than 85,000 English adults aged 40 to 89 years with a diabetes diagnosis and a measurement of glycated haemoglobin, or long-term blood sugar, which is a marker of diabetes control. The researchers compared diabetes patients with poor control to those with good control, and to people without diabetes.


Making an impact on infectious diseases - the challenges of global health

Thursday 1 February 6pm to 7:30pm

Dr Angela Loyse

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Pregnant women asked to take part in a vaccine trial to tackle a severe baby disease

St George's, University of London is offering expectant mothers the chance to be among the first in the world to participate in a clinical trial aimed at protecting babies from an illness which can cause life threatening breathing problems.

 

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High levels of hospital acquired infection on children’s intensive care wards, study shows

A new study demonstrates ‘unacceptably high’ rates of hospital-acquired infections among children in the UK and Europe.

13 January 2017


Experts urge more research to discover how many babies die from antibiotic resistance

No one knows how many newborns are dying each year due to antibiotic resistant infections, because of a lack of funding to research the issue fully, Professor Mike Sharland from St George’s, University London said.

18 May 2016