Free training programme will share expertise on leading cause of HIV-related deaths in Africa

To mark World Aids Day, global health researchers from St George’s are releasing training information to the wider health community about how to effectively and safely treat people suffering from one of the biggest causes of HIV-related mortality.

Meningo-encephalitis, together with tuberculosis, is one of the leading causes of HIV- related deaths. According to the most recent UNAIDS data there were close to 1 million AIDS-related deaths in 2017.


Global health humanities – putting the human story in global healthcare

Fifty years ago, medicine was considered a purely scientific discipline. Today’s doctors undoubtedly need this solid scientific knowledge, but, alongside this, medical training has increasingly emphasised a good bedside manner: patient engagement skills such as listening, observation and empathy.

This has led to a now well-established field of study called medical humanities, which focuses medical training on the human element of patients by drawing from other disciplines including literature, art, creative writing, drama, film, music, philosophy.


Early Career Researchers: Dr Henry Staines

Dr Henry Staines, Lecturer, in the Institute of Infection and Immunity talks about his ambitions and research in Early Career Researchers - a series of interviews that lift the lid on the Early Career Researcher community at St George’s, University of London.

16 March 2018

Henry Staines