Interviews with STI patients provide guidance for point-of care testing

A study of patient opinions and expectations about the potential use of point of care tests (POCTs) has found there is broad support for the introduction of these in sexually transmitted infection clinics, but that patients’ willingness to wait for results can be more complex.

Researchers carried out interviews with clinicians and patients in six sexual health clinics in the UK as part of a programme investigating the design and implementation of instant tests in these settings.

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Working Well When Times Are Hard

Few people navigate their careers without times when work is difficult, often because our professional and personal lives collide, says Professor Deborah Bowman, Deputy Principal (Institutional Affairs) and Professor of Bioethics, Clinical Ethics and Medical Law at St George’s.

Here, she shares her own experiences and explores how the St George’s community is opening up conversations around these issues.

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Tooting 'Science Stars' graduate

On Wednesday 27 March, fourteen GCSE students from Ernest Bevin College in Tooting Bec attended a graduation ceremony from the Science Stars programme at St George’s.

In total, 15 students from the college completed the 20-week programme created by our Widening Participation team in conjunction with St George’s alumnus, and Lecturer in Education at the University of Gloucestershire, Neil Gilbride.

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Researchers win £50,000 Cancer Research UK prize to make cancer antibodies in plants

Two researchers from St George’s have won a national prize for their novel plan to use plant engineering to create antibodies for cancer immunotherapy.

Cancer Research UK’s first Innovation Prizes support early-career researchers in identifying and progressing the commercial potential of their research.

Cancer research prize

Targeted deep brain stimulation reduced OCD symptoms, study shows

The debilitating behaviours and all-consuming thoughts which affect people with severe obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), could be significantly improved with targeted deep brain stimulation, according to the findings of a new study.

OCD is characterised by unwanted intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive stereotyped behaviours (compulsions- sometimes called rituals) and often means everyday activities become impossible for those with the condition. This repetitive and compulsive behaviour is commonly associated with either depressed mood or impairment in cognitive flexibility – an inability to flexibly adapt to changing situations.

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