Researchers provide compelling evidence for multiple STI-detecting device

Strong evidence in support of a rapid diagnostic test for multiple STI infections has been put forward by researchers at St George’s.

Using mathematical modelling, researchers within the Applied Diagnostics Research and Evaluation Unit at the university concluded that a bespoke point-of care diagnostic device could significantly reduce the number of return clinical visits and the average time-to-cure from about a week to one day.


Professor Denis Mitchison 1919-2018

Professor Denis Mitchison, who has died aged 98, will be remembered for his outstanding contribution to the field of tuberculosis research.

‘Denny’ as he was known, was Emeritus Professor in the Institute for Infection and Immunity at St George’s, and only formally retired from academic life in 2015.


Global health humanities – putting the human story in global healthcare

Fifty years ago, medicine was considered a purely scientific discipline. Today’s doctors undoubtedly need this solid scientific knowledge, but, alongside this, medical training has increasingly emphasised a good bedside manner: patient engagement skills such as listening, observation and empathy.

This has led to a now well-established field of study called medical humanities, which focuses medical training on the human element of patients by drawing from other disciplines including literature, art, creative writing, drama, film, music, philosophy.


St George’s registered as HE provider

St George’s has received notification from the Office for Students (OfS) that we are amongst the first institutions in the country to be successfully registered as an English HE provider with the OfS.

We are registered in the ‘approved (fee cap)’ category, which is for all providers who wish to receive direct teaching or research grant funding and requires evidence of enhanced financial sustainability. We have met all initial conditions of registration. According to the OfS website, being registered enables St George’s to: • access public grants, such as government funding for teaching or research• access student support funding (in other words, its students can get government loans)• apply for or maintain a licence to recruit international students• apply for the right to award its own degrees• apply for the right to call itself a university. In addition, our Access and Participation Plan has been approved by the Office for Students, allowing us to charge fees above the basic amount. View the OfS Register here.


Researchers discover new genes associated with heart function

A new study from an international research team, led by Dr Yalda Jamshidi at St George’s, University of London, has identified new genes associated with heart function and development. 

An electrocardiogram (ECG), which records a heart's rhythm and electrical activity, can be used to identify life-threatening heart problems which often have a strong genetic basis. The team compared ECGs and the genetic makeup of almost 200,000 individuals to gain insight into the genetics that underlie heart rhythm. This was done using large-scale genetic association studies focusing on protein-coding parts of the genome. They chose to focus on rare variants that are often missed in large scale population studies, for follow-up.