Academic awarded Honorary Fellowship from College of Paramedics

A leading researcher in cardiac care has been awarded an Honorary Fellowship from the College of Paramedics.

Professor of Cardiovascular Nursing Tom Quinn, lead for the Emergency, Cardiovascular and Critical Care Research Group in the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education which is run jointly by Kingston University and St George’s, University of London, was nominated for the award by paramedic colleagues in recognition of his achievements and outstanding contribution to improving and advancing paramedic practice and, in turn, improving both patient care and population health.


Pets help their owners fall asleep more easily and feel better about their neighbourhood

Older people who own pets fall asleep more easily and feel consistently more positive about their local environment than those who don’t have animals, according to new research from Kingston University and St George's, University of London.

Health and wellbeing expert Gill Mein conducted the research along with statistician Robert Grant.


PhD researcher wins £100K Wellcome Trust grant

Researcher and lecturer Dr Florencia Cavodeassi has received a major grant from the Wellcome Trust’s Seed Awards in Science.

 

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E-cigarettes research shows clear benefits of switching from tobacco

October has been designated ‘Stoptober’ again by the NHS as part of its ongoing campaign to persuade us to stop smoking.

Latest figures from the WHO show that smoking is still the number one preventable disease, killing seven million people globally each year. Stoptober is timely for Senior Lecturer Alexis Bailey who has presented preliminary results from his research on e-cigarettes at SRNT, the top nicotine and tobacco research conference, in Munich last month.There has been a meteoric rise of electric cigarette use in the UK since their introduction in 2006. In the UK, e-cigarettes are used by smokers to help them stop smoking as well as by former smokers, and it is estimated that there are 3.2 million e-cigarette users in the UK alone.


Poor diabetes control can lead to increased risk of serious infections, study shows

A new study has shown that diabetes patients with the poorest control of their blood sugars face the highest risks of hospitalisation and death due to infections.

The study, conducted by researchers at St George’s, University of London, analysed the electronic GP and hospital records of more than 85,000 English adults aged 40 to 89 years with a diabetes diagnosis and a measurement of glycated haemoglobin, or long-term blood sugar, which is a marker of diabetes control. The researchers compared diabetes patients with poor control to those with good control, and to people without diabetes.