Comedy night

St George's Professor Iain Greenwood has organised a comedy night this coming October to raise money for the British Heart Foundation (BHF).

You can expect to be entertained by a star-studded bill including:Nick Helm - hosts his own TV show on DAVESuzi Ruffell - the Guardian dubs her 'a real stand up gem'. Matt Forde - co-host of the Rock and Roll football show on Absolute RadioIain Stirling- the voice of hit summer TV show Love Island Event detailsDate: Thursday 18 OctoberTime: 7.30pmLocation: The Students' Union barBook your place: Tickets are £10 and can be purchased by emailing Iain directly. All profits go to the BHF.

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A medical applicants’ guide to Clearing and Adjustment

Medicine is one of the most competitive university courses to apply for. At St George’s, University of London alone, we received 10 applications for every place on our undergraduate medical degree last year. So, it’s no surprise that many applicants with the potential to be great doctors don’t get a place straight away. We’ve put together some options for you if you applied to medicine but aren’t holding a place.

Whether you didn’t receive any offers or you’ve received your A Level results and it’s not the news you’d hoped for, you don’t have to give up your ambitions. You have plenty of choices, even if you still have your heart set on a career in medicine.

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Results Day 2018: Top 10 Clearing Tips

You’ve received your A Level grades and it’s not the results you had hoped for. You may be feeling overwhelmed and emotional, but don’t panic, you still have options. Clearing gives you a second chance to find your perfect university place.

Every year thousands of students find university places through UCAS Clearing. Last year on results day, our Clearing and Adjustment hotlines received 3,500 telephone calls before midday alone. Students found places on courses including medicine, physiotherapy, paramedic sciences and biomedical sciences.Our Student Recruitment team have put together some top tips to help you navigate Clearing.

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Career change: from linguist to paramedic

Following a life-changing conversation three years ago, 27-year old Adrien Dansette quit his job and became a Paramedic Science student at St George’s. Now finishing his second year, Adrien reflects on his experiences so far and the reasons he took up the course.

Since the age of 11, Adrien had loved languages and had set his mind on becoming an interpreter. He spent four years studying Translation Studies French with a Spanish minor and a focus on socio- linguistics at Aston University.

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Death from cardiac disease in young football players is far higher than estimated, study shows

Researchers have found that silent heart conditions that cause sudden death in young athletes affect 1 in 266 football players affiliated with the English Football Association.

Death rates in these young players are also three times more prevalent than previously thought. Most deaths were due to heart muscle diseases that were not detectable with screening at the age of 16. The study highlights the importance of more regular heart screenings to detect these conditions, which, in most cases, are treatable and athletes can return to competitive sport.The study, which is the first comprehensive study into deaths caused by these inherited conditions, screened 11,168 young football players affiliated with the English Football Association over a 20-year period (1996-2016).It found that 42 of the players (0.38%) had cardiac irregularities that can lead to heart attacks, most of who (93%) presented no symptoms. The chance of sudden cardiac death was seven in every 100,000 players. This compares to previous estimates, which were crudely based on media reports, search engines and insurance claims, of 0.5 to two in every 100,000 players.The study was led by Sanjay Sharma, Professor of Inherited Diseases and Sports Cardiology at St George’s, University of London, who is Chair of the Expert Cardiac Committee of the Football Association (FA) and Dr Aneil Malhotra, Clinical Lecturer in Cardiology.Along with their team, they have been seeking to get an accurate picture of the numbers and causes of sudden cardiac death among adolescent soccer players in the UK, since there is no systematic registry of deaths in young athletes. Professor Sharma said:“The death of a young athletes is highly tragic when one considers that most deaths are due to congenital/inherited diseases of the heart that are detectable during life. Affected athletes lose decades of life. Such deaths raise questions about possible preventative strategies. One of the main obstacles to implicating cardiac screening in the young is the lack of information on the precise incidence of sudden cardiac death in athletes. It is well known that adolescent athletes are most vulnerable but, before this study, nobody has ever reported outcomes in a well-defined screened cohort.”Players were tested in the FA’s mandatory cardiac screening programme, which involves all youth academy players across the 92 professional clubs in the soccer league system. They were given a health questionnaire, physical exam, ECG and echocardiography. The assessments took place when young players signed their first professional contract, usually at age 16.Where possible, the 42 athletes who were found to have cardiac conditions were medically or surgically treated and allowed to return to sport safely, others were given medical advice to stop competing. In most cases (70%) the athletes could be treated and returned to competitive sport. Forty of the players are still alive and two, who went against medical advice to stop competing, have since died.During the study follow-up, the authors found that there had been a further six deaths from cardiac diseases due to inherited conditions that had not been picked up at the initial screening. At this time, the players were displaying normal screening results but had died an average of 6.8 years later.This suggests that screening at 16 will miss some cardiomyopathies in predisposed individuals; and that more serial assessments may be required.As a result of this the FA has already put serial evaluations into place at age 18 and then again at 20 and 25.Sanjay Sharma said: “Our results represent the minimum incidence of sudden cardiac death among screened adolescent soccer players. Since we may not have captured all cases of sudden death, the death rate could be higher. On our advice the FA has now extended the screening process to protect this cohort of young athletes.”This research, “Outcomes of Cardiac Screening in Adolescent Soccer Players”, is published today (Wednesday 8 August) in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was supported by funding from the England Football Association and the charity Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY).

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