Scientists discover how a killer fungus attacks HIV patients

Researchers have discovered that a type of white blood cell carries a deadly fungus into the brains of HIV positive patients, causing meningitis which kills more than 600,000 people a year.

The discovery could lead to more effective ways of tackling the deadly fungus as it infects the human body.

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The Art of Medicine: Eternal Art of the Simulated Mind

Our series 'The Art of Medicine' continued on Wednesday 16 April at 6pm with 'Eternal Art of the Simulated Mind'. Artist Alban Low and senior lecturer Harvey Wells of St George's, University of London and Kingston University presented their exciting new art exhibition and award-winning short films, working with health students and patients.

The work is based on mental health nursing students and their clinical simulations as part of their St George's, University of London and Kingston University training. The work presents fascinating insight into how art and healthcare can work together to help patients and professionals. This was a free public event, open to all and part of our series that aims to highlight how art, the humanities, science and medicine work together and emphasise the importance of varied perspectives for healthcare professionals.To find out more about the artist and view the films showcased please visit albanlow.co.uk

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George's spring 2013

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Computer 'geeks' to gather at the university to improve NHS

Self-proclaimed computer ‘geeks’ will come to St George’s, University of London, next month to discuss and explore ways the NHS should use new technology.

The ‘NHS Hack Day London 2014’ weekend of events have proved popular in the past and are very well attended by healthcare professionals, patients and developers who get together to make use of technology to try to improve the health service.

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New survey launched into serious infection in babies

Researchers have launched a national study to see how common the potentially fatal bacterial infection Group B streptococcus is in UK and Irish babies.

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a bacterium that can cause serious infections. It is the most important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and of meningitis in the first three months of life.

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