Five minutes with ...

Cathy Wield graduated from St George's in 1983 after studying Medicine. Here the Registrar in Accident and Emergency talks to us about her jobs, some of the things she loves, some which she loves to hate and her memories of St George's.

What is your job title?SP3(LAS) in Emergency Medicine

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Alumni authors - Cathy Weild

St George’s alumni are more than just great healthcare professionals, many have gone on to be successful contributors to the publishing world too.

Life After DarknessBy Cathy Weild (MBBS 1983)About the book:The remarkable and moving story of a doctor and mother of four who endured seven years of severe depression. Years of self-harm, attempted suicides and admissions to psychiatric units culminated in her resorting to brain surgery as a final attempt to escape her illness. The story of Cathy Wield covers the horrors of time spent in archaic institutions, the loss of any hope of recovery and certain death, to a full recovery following surgery. Today she had returned to her career and rediscovered the joys of life and her family. This story is one of hope from an often hidden and stigmatised disease.Buy the book on Amazon

Smoking at trendy hubble-bubble cafes may increase risk of heart disease, say experts

People who smoke shisha regularly could be increasing the threat of heart disease, according to new research.

Shisha smoking, which is also called hookah or hubble-bubble smoking, is a way of smoking tobacco which is sometimes mixed with flavouring, through a bowl using a hose or tube which has become fashionable in Middle Eastern-style cafes.

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Watch an interview to mark Diabetes UK Week 2014 with Professor Peter Kopelman, our Principal.

Diabetes Week is Diabetes UK's annual UK-wide awareness and fundraising week.

Watch and interview here on YouTube

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Health experts find Physician Associates provide efficient care for patients and can take the pressure off GPs

A study into the impact on the NHS of a new type of health worker who help doctors has shown they can help relieve pressure on general practitioners (GPs).

The Physician Associates (PAs) work to a supervising doctor and see mainly patients requesting same day or urgent appointments in general practice.

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