New research finds a way to predict which HIV patients will respond better to future therapeutic vaccine

A new study suggests that HIV patients with a higher level of a particular biomarker, or a measurable indicator found in the blood, may respond more favourably to an experimentalimmune activating vaccine.

Experts at St George’s, University of London, and Norwegian vaccine company, Bionor Pharma Researchers, believe the findings might lead to a more customised vaccine for certain patients, which potentially might permit them to come off antiretrovirals, drugs used to treat HIV.

b2ap3_thumbnail_hiv-and-aids-Cropped-rt.jpg

A glorious celebration of a new generation of healthcare professionals

The class of 2014 has graduated from St George’s and is now ready to become the next generation of healthcare professionals and researchers.

On one of the hottest days of the year, 490 students graduated at the presentation ceremony at London’s Barbican on Thursday 17 July. Degrees were given for the four and five-year MBBS Medicine courses, the BSc in Biomedical Science, the BSc in Healthcare Science (20 students specialising in Cardiac Physiology and three specialising in Respiratory and Sleep Physiology) the BSc in Biomedical Informatics, and those studying intercalated BSc degrees at St George’s. Postgraduate diplomas and certificates were also awarded. Sajjaad Ismail, who graduated in MBBS medicine, said: "I can't believe I've finally graduated. I'm sad to leave St George's but excited for the new chapter in my life starting as a trainee doctor next week in the Fairfield General Hospital in Manchester."Fahmin Khaleque, who graduated in Biomedical Sciences and is from Bangladesh, said: "Today has been overwhelming and I'm excited for the future. I'm looking forward to coming back to St George's to study medicine."Shashank Sivji, who graduated in intercalated BSc Medicine, said: " It's a really proud day today. It's nice to see everyone today before everyone leaves for different places and new adventures."

b2ap3_thumbnail_grad-3-Cropped-cc.jpg

The Art of Medicine: The Empathy Exams

We had a full house as New York Times acclaimed author Leslie Jamison visited St George's, University of London to discuss her new book and work as an actor teaching medical students empathy.

Leslie visited St George's on the back of a tour of her new book The Empathy Exams, which has received high praise both in the US and the UK. The book has been described as "A heady and unsparing examination of pain and how it allows us to understand others, and ourselves" and Leslie demonstrated her shrewd critical perspective as she discussed the importance of engendering empathy in future healthcare professionals.

b2ap3_thumbnail_eyes-Cropped.jpg

Experts to combat the potential ‘health catastrophe’ of deadly tuberculosis among people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate the benefits of different ways to carry out screening both patients with tuberculosis (TB) for diabetes and the other way around in parts of the world where both diseases are common.

Those who live in urban areas and on low incomes in less well-off countries are especially at risk of developing TB.

b2ap3_thumbnail_tb-and-stethoscope-rs-Cropped.jpg

Spotlight on Science: Resisting the Antibiotic Apocalypse

On Thursday 3 July 2014 we imagined a world without antibiotics, where basic operations and common infections become a major threat to humanity and welcomed the public in to find out more about our antibiotic research.

Wendy Lawson, of the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Antibiotic Action, was one of the speakers and she described the current state of antibiotics.Academics from St George's, Professor Jodi Lindsay and Dr Tim Planche and Professor Philip Butcher also gave their expert opinions.Prof Lindsay discussed the future of the bacterial infection while Professor Philip Butcher spoke about tuberculosis (TB) and how London now has the highest level of TB infections in Europe.Dr Tim Planche gave a valuable insight from a clinician's perspective on the waning effectiveness of antibiotics.The Infection Control team from St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust joined the event and demonstrated proper hand-washing techniques to attendees, who also got the opportunity to chat with our researchers and use some of the equipment from our labs.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Anti_Biotic_Seminar_141-Croppedb.jpg