St George's curriculum to be taught in new Northern Irish medical school

Ulster University has agreed that the medical curriculum from St George's, University of London will be taught at its Graduate Entry Medical School.

The four-year medical degree will widen access to medical training to address the skills and workforce challenges currently faced by the health care sector in Northern Ireland.

Ulster University coat

First Clinical Pharmacology BSc to launch in September

St George’s is launching a brand new undergraduate Clinical Pharmacology BSc in September 2019. The course, the first of its kind in the UK, will teach students how drugs are developed as well as how they act practically both in the human body and in healthcare more generally.

The course has been designed in response to a skills gap identified by pharmaceutical companies. The St George’s Clinical Pharmacology course will equip graduates with the knowledge, practical skills and knowhow to thrive in the work place.

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Varma Lecture: Are we sowing the seed for the destruction of the human?

You are invited to the latest in the Varma Lecture Series, 'Are we sowing the seed for the destruction of the human?' by Lord Professor Robert Winston, Emeritus Professor of Fertility Studies, Imperial College London.

The lecture will take place at 5.30pm on Tuesday 30 October in the Michael Heron Lecture Theatre, first floor, Hunter Wing.

Varma Lecture

The Class of 2018 share their stories

On 19 July, the Class of 2018 came together for one final time at the St George’s Graduation Ceremony to receive their degrees, celebrate their success and wave goodbye to the end of an era. Among them was a PhD student completing his second St George’s degree, a biomedical scientist who will be returning to St George’s for postgraduate study and a 43 year old who was inspired to retrain as a doctor following a bout of illness.

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PhD student shortlisted for Max Perutz Science Writing Award

St George's PhD student Natasha Clarke has been shortlisted for the Max Perutz Science Writing Award for her essay submission ‘How artificial intelligence, and a cup of tea, could help diagnose Alzheimer's disease'. The award asks Medical Research Council funded PhD students to write up to 800 words about their research and why it matters, in a way that would interest a non-scientific audience. It is named after 1962 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry Dr Max Perutz.

Of her essay submission Natasha says, “I am using language to try and help spot the signs of disease sooner. For part of my research I'm studying the spoken language of people diagnosed with early Alzheimer's, compared to people ageing healthily, following them over one year.

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